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Thread: Turntable Maintenance Introduction

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by magos View Post
    judging from the little space between the top of the foot and the base of the turntable it looks like they are not all equidistant. I am assuming that this means the turntable is leaning slightly in one direction, which would affect the balance and anti-skate.

    Does this makes sense? Are the feet supposed to all have equal distance? Is the weight of the turntable evenly distributed to all 4 corners? Is there some trick to screwing in the feet so they are all the same distance?
    If the turntable is unlevel that will definitely affect the way the tonearm behaves. The space between the feet and the base of the turntable is irrelevent if the surface the turntable sits on is unlevel. The weight is not evenly distributed so by their nature Technics tend to sit unlevel (this of course will differ from table to table...)

    To level the turntable, take a small spirit level and place it on the platter. Start with the spirit level running side to side. Then screw the turntable feet in or out until the the bubble reads level. Next place the spirit level running front to back and adjust the feet again if necessary. There's no real trick to it except trial and improvement.
    www.dnbradio.com

    Quote Originally Posted by Doppelganger
    He's just like me, only he's a man and more stupid

  2. #12
    New Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    london
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    Thanks DTR, very helpful.

  3. #13
    I vote for sticky, and for subsequent additions to this thread.
    youtube.com/djg0onie
    soundcloud.com/djgoonie
    scotched.tumblr.com/post/943312242/how-to-install-serato-sl1-inside-your-mixer

  4. #14
    New Member
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    May 2013
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
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    3
    I just got my two new Technics 1210's and when my tonearms is suppose to float over the record, they swing back to rest, very slowly.
    I asked this question here yesterday and apparently its a problem if the tonearm wildly swing back, but if its moving slow back to rest,
    is not a big problem. https://www.kabusa.com/frameset.htm?/sl1200tonearm.htm . This website also says just that. I use my turntables for
    scratching. What do you think?

  5. #15
    New Member
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    Dec 2012
    Location
    netherlands
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    29
    half of the site from kabusa is outdated

  6. #16
    Any advice for static? Stupid house doesn't have proper grounding, and even so, my amp doesn't have a ground plug anyways so I figure check the ground connections in the TT and amp, and then if that doesn't work buy some anti static thing. It's cold and dry and I have carpet so that's not an ideal combo; but I have a feeling it's not just coming from me it's gotta be some connections somewhere because I got a microfiber cloth to wipe dust and the stock brush for the stylus I use...

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by thehadgi View Post
    Any advice for static? Stupid house doesn't have proper grounding....
    What turntable and amp do you have? The grounding of your house shouldn't have much to do with it, because the grounding of a turntable is not the same as the grounding of your home's electrical system. Assuming your TT and amp (no mixer in between?) are plugged into the same outlet or power strip, and your TT has an internal ground, that should be a good enough connection between the two to ground the TT. Having said that, I've seen some funny things when it comes to turntable grounding. I once had a turntable receiving a radio station and playing it through the mixer.....

    Try taking a length of wire and bridging it between any exposed metalwork on your TT and amp. Loosening a screw and clamping the wire under that usually works. If that gets rid of the static then that's your problem - you need a dedicated ground wire. Using a microfibre cloth isn't going to get rid of the static because it's not that kind of static; it's noise picked up from the surrounding electrical environment that gets amplified by the very sensitive preamps.
    www.dnbradio.com

    Quote Originally Posted by Doppelganger
    He's just like me, only he's a man and more stupid

  8. #18
    Ah ok, thanks for the info. Yeah so what I tried is one of the computer grounding wristlet straps and clamped the end to the amp ground, and then that seemed to remove the the static and 'hum' every time I touched the tonearm. Guess I was charging the vinyl somehow, and the ground in my turntable must not be internally connected right, else the charge would dissipate through to the amp ground without need for the wrist strap ground, right?

  9. #19
    Wouldn't be surprised if it was my fault too; opened it up last week to tune it up and managed to brake the skate control wire/mechanism, which is a cheap plastic thing on my ion itt02 (of which I cannot find reference material for online...)

    So now I might be posting up a new thread; 'how to replace the skate control' lol. Although to be fair I doubt it's an issue; my tonearm doesn't move from the middle position when balanced and I only use it for playing, no scratching or touching while the record is playing.

    Also finding out a lot of my vinyl is warped from some storage time... Now gotta research on here because I remember someone posted some thing about unwarping. Grrr

    Thanks again

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by thehadgi View Post
    Ah ok, thanks for the info. Yeah so what I tried is one of the computer grounding wristlet straps and clamped the end to the amp ground, and then that seemed to remove the the static and 'hum' every time I touched the tonearm. Guess I was charging the vinyl somehow, and the ground in my turntable must not be internally connected right, else the charge would dissipate through to the amp ground without need for the wrist strap ground, right?
    It's not that you're charging the vinyl with static. The tonearm and wiring naturally picks up electrical interference from the world around it (all wiring does this). In most cases it's not a problem as the noise (interference) is so small. However the phono preamps in your amp or mixer have to be extremely sensitive in order to amplify the tiny signals from your phono carts. At the same time as amplifying the phono signal, they also amplify the noise to a level that you can hear.

    The noise being picked up is static in the sense that it can't go anywhere. This means that the noise is at the TT is at a different level to that at the amp (a "potential difference" in electrical terms) so the amp "sees" it. By attaching a ground wire between the amp and TT, this gives the static an escape route and makes the two levels the same. With the noise being at the same level, the amp can't "see" it anymore so it doesn't amplify it.

    Do you have access to a multimeter?
    www.dnbradio.com

    Quote Originally Posted by Doppelganger
    He's just like me, only he's a man and more stupid

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