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Thread: Connecting YamahaDXR15, CerwinVega Sub P1800SX and External Mixer

  1. #1
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    Connecting YamahaDXR15, CerwinVega Sub P1800SX and External Mixer

    Good Evening ...

    Hello,

    I am seeking advice regarding optimal setup of my rig, consisting of the following


    Pionner DDJ SX2 Controller: https://www.pioneerdj.com/en/product...lack/overview/

    Soundcraft Signature 10 External Mixer1 https://www.soundcraft.com/en/products/signature-10

    Mackie 402VLZ4 External Mixer2: https://www.sweetwater.com/store/det...-channel-mixer

    CerwinVega P1800SX Subwoofer: http://www.cerwinvega.com/pro-audio/...s/p1800sx.html

    Yamaha DXR15 Speakers: https://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-...active-speaker

    Note: There are two mixers: the Soundcraft is the version I've been using, but like the compactness of the Mackie I just received as a gift.

    Here is my current setup:

    DjGearSetup2.jpg


    It involves connecting the main out (from the controller) to the input on the external mixer (e.g., the Mackie). Then the output from the mixer to the inputs on the sub. And then using the thru outputs from the subs to the speakers.

    The crossover setting on both the tops and the subs will allow me to separate the high and low frequencies: The Yamaha tops have built in crossover set at 100Hz, but the sub has a built on crossover set at 80Hz. Engaging it (the sub crossover) will send all frequencies above 80Hz to the tops and those below (80Hz) to the sub. The top (full range speakers) crossover will be turned off since the sub has presumably separated the low/high frequencies..... am I correct in this assumption or should I go ahead and engage the 100Hz crossover for the tops ?

    I just have a feeling this is a rather long connection, and the sound output sometimes is not loud enough. So I am open to other suggestions to optimize my setup.

    Thanks - Oyiwa

  2. #2
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    You could go from the mixer to the tops and then from the thru out to the subs. If your sub is able to be set to 100 then you may get a better sound. Basically set your tops and subs to the same crossover point. I run my Yamaha DX12’s with my EV118P’s. The EV sub is internally set at 120 so I engage the 120 setting on my tops.


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  3. #3
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    DJ Que Yi:Thanks so much for your comments. When the subs's THRU & LPF SUB switch is set, it engages two filters simultaneously:

    (1) low pass filter attenuate frequencies above 80Hz for the P1800SX subwoofer.
    (2) high pass filter will attenuate frequencies below 80Hz on the THRU 1 & 2 outputs.

    So, I am wondering what ahppens to the frequencies between 80 (on the sub) and 100 (tops)?

    FWIW, the sub has the following ranges:

    Frequency Range (-10 dB): 31.5 Hz – 272.0 Hz
    Frequency Response (±3 dB): 38.0 Hz – 183.0 Hz

    thoughts ??

    /Oyiwaa

  4. #4
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    (
    So, I am wondering what ahppens to the frequencies between 80 (on the sub) and 100 (tops)?


    /Oyiwaa[/QUOTE]

    I personally believe that you have a frequency gap during playback.


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  5. #5
    If you have both the low pass filter on and the high pass filter on it's the same as having them both off.
    In both cases, all of the frequencies will be passing through.
    Howie Hawkins for President 2020

  6. #6
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    So how do you handle the frequency gap and compensate for it?

    Oyiwaa

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Windows 95 View Post
    If you have both the low pass filter on and the high pass filter on it's the same as having them both off.
    In both cases, all of the frequencies will be passing through.
    But isn’t the purpose of the filters is to control the frequencies of the specific speakers so that you maximize the engineering of the speaker? I wouldn’t want high end frequencies passed to my sub which is engineered to maximize low end reproduction and vice versa I wouldn’t want my 12 inch tops trying to produce sub low end bass. With them set the frequencies will pass through the proper speaker.


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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oyiwaa View Post
    So how do you handle the frequency gap and compensate for it? Oyiwaa
    There won't be a gap, these filters are not brick walls there is always overlap and since the sub is often run a bit hotter than the tops any gap left will be filled in.

    The best way to connect and configure these is to use XLR connections from the mixer main outs to the sub inputs, link from the sub outputs to the tops, and engage the filter on the sub only! That produces an 80hz crossover for both boxes which is pretty much ideal for these speakers.
    And connect the controller from the RCA main outputs to a stereo line input channel with RCA to 1/4" TS cables. It's not advised to connect the controller XLR main outputs to the mic inputs on the mixer, it's pretty easy to over drive them and distort your sound with the relatively high signal levels present on the XLR outputs.

    * I just looked at the user manual and updated my reply.
    Last edited by conanski; 03-09-2020 at 06:09 PM.
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  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Que Yi View Post
    I wouldn’t want high end frequencies passed to my sub
    Which is what the low pass filter is for. A low pass filter will allow low frequencies to "pass" through while blocking all the frequencies above the crossover point.
    While a high pass filter lets the highs pass through and block the lows.
    Howie Hawkins for President 2020

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Windows 95 View Post
    Which is what the low pass filter is for. A low pass filter will allow low frequencies to "pass" through while blocking all the frequencies above the crossover point.
    While a high pass filter lets the highs pass through and block the lows.
    I agree. I think we’re both saying the same thing.


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