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Thread: is it me or has the controller market really slowed down?

  1. #21
    Banned™ Manu's Avatar
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    ^^^Most things out of of the ordinary is considered "nerdy"


    It's about use what you have, most kids just won't go through the effort of that. In my opinion, those who last are those who have the passion of it. I have heard a lot of noobs mixes with levels all over the place, cue points all over the place, no EQing, key clashing, too quiet, too loud, etc. But it's locked in beat so they're wondering why it's going wrong. A machine also will not replace a good ear, or substitute a good taste in music applied to a whole mix...

    Lots of variables out there, many will want to play the game, few will do the actual grind. It's not as easy as it looks

    Like, to give one example, i have a friend who has been a couple of years DJing now, relative to me she is new to the game. we got together a few weeks back to talk about DJing, specifically so that she could jump on my equipment at my residency if i needed to take a quick break, and i could do the same for her.
    during the conversation she mentioned that she still does not use the sync button, and tries to mix manually, yet there was a lot of functions on her controler such as loops, cue points etc, which she said she just doesnt use at all.
    I gave her my opinion, which is, ok when you a re totally new you should try to learn to match manually, but once your professional, you are better of focusing on things that make a difference. all of the time spent manually beatmatching is time you could be spending thinking about other things that may actually improve your performance in a way that the crowd can actually see or hear it. the thing about digital DJing, is it is so customizable now that you never now what that thing might be.
    Kudos to her. It's not about what you don't use

  2. #22
    Banned™ Manu's Avatar
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    ^^^Most things out of of the ordinary is considered "nerdy"


    It's about use what you have, most kids just won't go through the effort of that. In my opinion, those who last are those who have the passion of it. I have heard a lot of noobs mixes with levels all over the place, cue points all over the place, no EQing, key clashing, too quiet, too loud, etc. But it's locked in beat so they're wondering why it's going wrong. A machine also will not replace a good ear, or substitute a good taste in music applied to a whole mix...

    Lots of variables out there, many will want to play the game, few will do the actual grind. It's not as easy as it looks

    Like, to give one example, i have a friend who has been a couple of years DJing now, relative to me she is new to the game. we got together a few weeks back to talk about DJing, specifically so that she could jump on my equipment at my residency if i needed to take a quick break, and i could do the same for her.
    during the conversation she mentioned that she still does not use the sync button, and tries to mix manually, yet there was a lot of functions on her controler such as loops, cue points etc, which she said she just doesnt use at all.
    I gave her my opinion, which is, ok when you a re totally new you should try to learn to match manually, but once your professional, you are better of focusing on things that make a difference. all of the time spent manually beatmatching is time you could be spending thinking about other things that may actually improve your performance in a way that the crowd can actually see or hear it. the thing about digital DJing, is it is so customizable now that you never now what that thing might be.
    Kudos to her. It's not about what you don't use, are we getting there yet

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Manu View Post
    Kudos to her. It's not about what you don't use, are we getting there yet
    Kudos to her for trying to do things right. yes

    you know DJs like that are being told they need to do this and as I said, when starting out, I think it's important to put some time into it. but ultimately if that's the way you want to go with it then just get turntables.
    If you are using a controller as a part of a weekly DJ night, I don't see the point in placing arbitrary limitations on ourselves, just to prove something (in our own head, because the crowd doesn't know anyways)


    We should not fear the technology. it makes things easier, yes, but this should raise the bar for talented, passionate DJs, not just novice DJs. If the gap is narrowing, then its on the passionate Dj to try and think of some way to use the equipment to distinguish him/herself from the novice.

    Quote Originally Posted by Manu View Post
    It's not about what you don't use, are we getting there yet
    if you ask me, I think what it's about, is what the crowd is hearing and seeing and I think the technology can and should be exploited to that effect rather than just emulating an old redundant technology.

    and just To be clear, I'm not a fan of those live mashups that people do with samples and cue points, i don't like to butcher the music, but I think it's up to us to look for creative ideas that work well with the music. that's the challenge we have today, to try to think of how to use the technology to advance
    Last edited by DJ Matt; 03-07-2020 at 09:11 PM.

  4. #24
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    beatmatching is pretty fun, especially for pros that can beatmatch in 5 seconds without headphones(on the fly) why not know how to do it as well as learn the capabilities of the equipment... i've got some cdj's (1000mk3) and having the limits of those just pushed me to get more creative with them... hot cues for on the fly splicing and rearrange a melody and using pitch control to my advantage... u can take the black tape of your bpm counters now... by the way, the 1200's are heaps of fun as well...

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Matt View Post
    Kudos to her for trying to do things right. yes

    you know DJs like that are being told they need to do this and as I said, when starting out, I think it's important to put some time into it. but ultimately if that's the way you want to go with it then just get turntables.
    If you are using a controller as a part of a weekly DJ night, I don't see the point in placing arbitrary limitations on ourselves, just to prove something (in our own head, because the crowd doesn't know anyways)


    We should not fear the technology. it makes things easier, yes, but this should raise the bar for talented, passionate DJs, not just novice DJs. If the gap is narrowing, then its on the passionate Dj to try and think of some way to use the equipment to distinguish him/herself from the novice.



    if you ask me, I think what it's about, I'm not a fan of those live mashups that people do with samples and cue points, i don't like to butcher the music, but I think it's up to us to look for creative ideas that work well with the music. that's the challenge we have today, to try to think of how to use the technology to advance
    I'm a fan when its done proper as f3k, decent knowing the dj can change a song heard over and over into something good... Richard Durand and Eddie Halliwell do it right

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Like View Post
    beatmatching is pretty fun, especially for pros that can beatmatch in 5 seconds without headphones(on the fly) why not know how to do it as well as learn the capabilities of the equipment... i've got some cdj's (1000mk3) and having the limits of those just pushed me to get more creative with them... hot cues for on the fly splicing and rearrange a melody and using pitch control to my advantage... u can take the black tape of your bpm counters now... by the way, the 1200's are heaps of fun as well...
    I'm definitely not arguing for not knowing how to beat match manually. I have 1210s myself, still do events with them but at the same time. im making the argument to just go ahead and try to use the technology to its fullest. this depends also on what kind of music you DJ. like, .if i was DJing straight up house/trance/techno music and doing it the way I used to, then I would prefer to beat match manually and I would probably use DVS for that as my preferred medium. but nowadays I do a lot more varied music, and in video format its a whole different thing.
    but my point is I don't think it makes a whole lot of sense, controller Djs in the long run, limiting themselves arbitrarily in an attempt to imitate older DJ formats, and sometimes at the expense of being able to really exploit the computer for what it is good at.
    Last edited by DJ Matt; 03-08-2020 at 11:26 AM.

  7. #27
    heres one area that i think controllers could innovate, that they havent done before.

    this product the 'streamdeck' enables you to create custom buttons, and display your own graphics on the buttons. this in theory could be used alongside a controller, i think im going to try this.
    but someday, it would be nice to have controllers with a certain amount of this built into it. so that the user can customise it to how they like to use it, and bring some of the hidden features to the forefront.
    If they are building screens and drum machines into controllers now, they should be able to do this.

    https://www.thomann.de/ie/elgato_str...xoC8h8QAvD_BwE


    you could also build a ball mouse with left and right click & scroll wheel into the controller. might sound a bit crazy, but means less USB ports taken up. and less leaning over onto your laptop
    Last edited by DJ Matt; 03-08-2020 at 03:21 PM.

  8. #28
    This is fairly innovative ! Denon DJ prime GO


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