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Thread: Mackie SRM450v3 Advice

  1. #1
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    Mackie SRM450v3 Advice

    Hi all

    Just got 2 x Mackie SRM450v3 to use for dance performances with music played just from an iPod or iPad...

    I just have a question about how to connect the iPod up to the system to get the best sound as I have been advised on a few options scrolling the internet... the option been advised to me are:

    1. Connecting the iPod using a headphone jack to red and white aux cable into the back of one speaker then using an XLR cable to connect that speaker to the other (daisy chaining I think itís called).

    2. Connecting the iPod using a headphone jack to a split xlr cable (such as this https://www.whybuynew.co.uk/accessor...-xlr-cable.htm) then connecting them into the speaker something like how this guys explains in this video https://youtu.be/2_ai0zXWZ7g

    3. Using a mixer... which I am not sure will make any difference to the sound which is produced as I think thatís what is already built into the SRM450v3ís.

    What would you recommend is there any pros and cons to any of the above methods... or are they wrong.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Deez Beats! KLH's Avatar
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    The quick answer is that "It depends." I say that because you can have a choice as to how you want to hear sound:

    1. Two mono speakers that combine the left and right stereo channels
    2. Two mono speakers that use only the left stereo channel
    3. Two mono speakers that use only the right stereo channel
    4. Stereo speakers that use both stereo channels

    I personally would choose #4 (stereo) above, but several might prefer #1 (two monos).

    I'll cover both. As an aside, you could put a compact mixer in between the iPod and the speakers. Doing so gives a little more flexibility and control to how the iPod works. Your mileage may vary with this.

    Two mono speakers that combine the left and right stereo channels
    1. Use a 1/8" TRS-to-two-RCAs adapter to connect the iPod to one speaker.
    2. Use a XLR cable to the speaker's THRU output to the input 1 on the speaker where the iPod is not connected.
    3. Play music on the iPod and listen via the speakers

    Stereo speakers that use both stereo channels
    1. Use a 1/8" TRS-to-two-XLRs adapter to connect the iPod to each speaker's input 1.
    2. Play music on the iPod and listen via the speakers

    Keep in mind that you'll likely have to gain-stage before you use either setups outside of the bedroom.
    -KLH
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    Thank you for the response... I am quite new to this so I am learning lol...

    I think I would prefer a stereo sound through the speakers...

    So just so I know I have got this right in regards to #4:

    If I connect my iPod using this cable: https://www.whybuynew.co.uk/accessor...-xlr-cable.htm

    Then use 2 x XLR cables from that to each speakers 1 input?

    -

    Now if that’s right, I just have a few questions:

    1. I presume a mixer wouldnt make much difference in terms of sound quality and volume is that right?

    2. The XLR cables I was given with the speakers are called Microphone cables are they ok for this?

    3. I was told by someone from mackie that using this method isn’t the best as it converts an unbalanced signal to a balanced connector which can confuse equipment? Is that a load of rubbish or is that something which could cause issues.

    Thanks for the reply!

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    Quote Originally Posted by triflehead View Post
    Now if thatís right, I just have a few questions:

    1. I presume a mixer wouldnt make much difference in terms of sound quality and volume is that right?

    2. The XLR cables I was given with the speakers are called Microphone cables are they ok for this?

    3. I was told by someone from mackie that using this method isnít the best as it converts an unbalanced signal to a balanced connector which can confuse equipment? Is that a load of rubbish or is that something which could cause issues.

    Thanks for the reply!
    The 450v3 has a pair of RCA connectors on the back correct? If so connect you phone directly to one speaker with a 1/8 to dual RCA cable and run an XLR between the two speakers, output from the one the phone is connected to and input on the other. And make sure you get the correct cable for an apple device and not a generic, I believe they use a special TRSS connector.

    1. A mixer would make a difference if connecting to the XLR inputs, it is likely the phone would not generate a strong enough signal to drive the speakers to full power but a mixer would.

    2. Those cables are fine.

    3. No you can't confuse a speaker, but a long unbalanced connection can pickup noise so is not recommended.
    Paul O'Brien
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  5. #5
    Deez Beats! KLH's Avatar
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    Congratulations on starting to build your knowledge! There's a lot to learn, but very few ways to mess things up.

    Quote Originally Posted by triflehead View Post
    1. I presume a mixer wouldnt make much difference in terms of sound quality and volume is that right?
    The mixer makes it easier to add additional sound sources (like a mic) and control volume. At this point, they do not usually affect sound quality significantly. The speakers add more distortion!

    Quote Originally Posted by triflehead View Post
    2. The XLR cables I was given with the speakers are called Microphone cables are they ok for this?
    These are the correct cables. You're good to go!

    Quote Originally Posted by triflehead View Post
    3. I was told by someone from mackie that using this method isn’t the best as it converts an unbalanced signal to a balanced connector which can confuse equipment? Is that a load of rubbish or is that something which could cause issues.
    Here's the deal. The sound quality isn't impacted by balanced or unbalanced. Balanced refers to an analog technique of rejecting noise over long cable lengths (10+ feet). Unbalanced doesn't have this technique, so it tends to pick up noise when cables are long. If your wiring is less than 10', then balanced and unbalanced are basically the same thing.

    For your application, if you want to run a balanced signal to the speakers, get a compact mixer than can output a balanced signal. If you don't do this, then the balanced cables won't have a balanced signal going through them and thus they'll be susceptible to picking up noise in long cable runs.

    Quote Originally Posted by conanski View Post
    The 450v3 has a pair of RCA connectors on the back correct? If so connect you phone directly to one speaker with a 1/8 to dual RCA cable and run an XLR between the two speakers, output from the one the phone is connected to and input on the other.
    This is the dual-mono from the combination of a stereo signal to a mono signal that I referred to below.


    Quote Originally Posted by conanski View Post
    And make sure you get the correct cable for an apple device and not a generic, I believe they use a special TRSS connector.
    Smartphones and tablets support microphones in addition to stereo sound, so the extra "S" (TRSS) provides the mic channel. iPods didn't have this, so TRS is fine.
    Last edited by KLH; 02-12-2020 at 05:49 PM.
    -KLH
    Visit DJF's Beginner's MEGA thread and drop by my Facebook Fan Page.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KLH View Post
    This is the dual-mono from the combination of a stereo signal to a mono signal that I referred to below.
    Depends on the speakers, Yamaha DXRs have a switch to split a stereo input to 2 separate speakers.
    Paul O'Brien
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  7. #7
    Deez Beats! KLH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by conanski View Post
    Depends on the speakers, Yamaha DXRs have a switch to split a stereo input to 2 separate speakers.
    That is a great point and good to know.

    I just looked up the capabilities of the SRM450v3, and it sums the RCA's Left and Right channels before sending to the THRU output.
    -KLH
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    Thanks for all the information guys, it’s really appreciated!

    Quote Originally Posted by KLH View Post
    That is a great point and good to know.

    I just looked up the capabilities of the SRM450v3, and it sums the RCA's Left and Right channels before sending to the THRU output.
    What do you mean by this if you don’t mind me asking?

    -

    Also a quick question after reading through the manual it says that you should set any line input to where it says line on the gain control... is this is a solid rule or can you exceed this if the volume is too low?

    Thanks

  9. #9
    Deez Beats! KLH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by triflehead View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by KLH View Post
    it sums the RCA's Left and Right channels before sending to the THRU output.
    What do you mean by this if you don’t mind me asking?
    I simply mean that even though you provide a stereo signal to one speaker, the speaker will add the two signals together to create a mono signal. It's this combined mono signal that is sent to the THRU output - which can go to the other speaker via the XLR cable.

    I say the above because Conanski said that some speaker systems provide the ability to play in stereo by having one speaker play one stereo side and then use the THRU to pass the second stereo side to the other speaker. The SRM450v3 doesn't do this.

    Quote Originally Posted by triflehead View Post
    Also a quick question after reading through the manual it says that you should set any line input to where it says line on the gain control... is this is a solid rule or can you exceed this if the volume is too low?
    You can do what you want. You may want to read about the activity called gain-staging.
    Last edited by KLH; 02-13-2020 at 10:26 AM.
    -KLH
    Visit DJF's Beginner's MEGA thread and drop by my Facebook Fan Page.

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    Right I am highly confused at the min, I have decided I am going to get a mixer to go with these speakers, the one I have settled on is the Mackie Mix5 as it seems nice and small and it’s cheap lol and I presume this is capable of a balanced output.

    Now as I understand I can connect my iPod into it with the Red and white RCA input and make sure the ‘TO MAIN’ switch is on... now where I am confused is how to connect the mixer to the speakers, I know it’s a jack to XLR cable I would need which is plugged into the ‘MAIN OUT’ part of the mixer, but looking online the jack end sometimes has two rings on them and some have a single ring... so I am not which to get... any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks again

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