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Thread: What is a decent turntable nowadays?

  1. #1

    What is a decent turntable nowadays?

    Thinking of selling my trusty old technics 1210mkii's

    i dont really use them for DJing out anymore , i think my days of heavy mixing on turntables are up.
    so im thinking of just buying one turntable that i can use to listen to my music mostly at home

    whats good nowadays? would you have any recommendations?

    i see a lot of reloop, numark etc brands, but i have really no idea if the quality is any good.
    back in the day when i baught these technics, literally everything else did not come even close to being professional standard but i believe that has all changed now.

    i also see that some of them are USB, what is this useful for? is this useful for digitizing your music?
    Last edited by DJ Matt; 10-14-2019 at 08:52 AM.
    My Neighbours listen to good music
    weather they like it or not
    www.djmatt.net

  2. #2
    A properly serviced Technics 1200 series turntable is fine for listening and is equal too or rival so called hi-fi turntables. They were originally built for that purpose. As for digitizing your albums your mixer you all ready own and a line in on your computer will do the same.
    QSC GTDaudio B52 Numark NS7 American DJ Hercules 4Mx ACER Behringer Peavey Koss CerwinVega Selenium VDJ= Sweet Music
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by drzinc View Post
    As for digitizing your albums your mixer you all ready own and a line in on your computer will do the same.
    I tried that before, I was going into a decent denon Mixer. But when I made comparisons between my digitized /remastered vinyl and other digital remasters that i baught online or on CD, i was not impressed, it invariably always seemed to sound inferior. not something you would notice unless you listen side by side.
    My Neighbours listen to good music
    weather they like it or not
    www.djmatt.net

  4. #4
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    It's not the weakness of the A/D converters, even cheap ones are really good today, and have been for a longer time. You need to rebalance the mix due to what ever needle you used (they're all different) and you'll need to do some mild over normalising to bring the level up. The easiest solution is to simply not do it and buy the CD, many can be got cheap on ebay and discogs, sellers will do you huge bulk discount deals. You could always buy the MP3 but that will cost a lot more if buying bulks. Only is some rare cases with some early 90's stuff are the Digital masters very bad, where you're better off trying to get a pristine vinyl rip and remastering it yourself, which takes months of learning. Sometimes what they'd do is simply turn up the master... clip it to death, which would result in harsh harmonics at the crest of build ups, then put it to CD, not a correct CD master, which also ended up being the mp3 version.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by mitchiemasha View Post
    It's not the weakness of the A/D converters, even cheap ones are really good today, and have been for a longer time. You need to rebalance the mix due to what ever needle you used (they're all different) and you'll need to do some mild over normalising to bring the level up. The easiest solution is to simply not do it and buy the CD, many can be got cheap on ebay and discogs, sellers will do you huge bulk discount deals. You could always buy the MP3 but that will cost a lot more if buying bulks. Only is some rare cases with some early 90's stuff are the Digital masters very bad, where you're better off trying to get a pristine vinyl rip and remastering it yourself, which takes months of learning. Sometimes what they'd do is simply turn up the master... clip it to death, which would result in harsh harmonics at the crest of build ups, then put it to CD, not a correct CD master, which also ended up being the mp3 version.
    yeah, I only do my own conversions with Vinyl which is not available digitally, of which there is still a certain amount in the genres that I play (salsa music)
    they are making some headway on it, but there is still a large amount of music that was never digitized, or never really officially digitized, i suspect that is due to the prevalence of music piracy in latin america, there may not be a whole lot of financial motivation in doing an official digital remaster
    Last edited by DJ Matt; 10-14-2019 at 06:11 PM.
    My Neighbours listen to good music
    weather they like it or not
    www.djmatt.net

  6. #6
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    I own two Reloop RP 7000 MKII and can highly recommend them. Very high quality and high torque. Sound quality is superb. I bought them for 400 euro a piece, which is a very good price I'd say for a turntable of such quality.

  7. #7
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    Why would you not use your mk2 as your audiophile turntable? It was originally design as an audiophile turntable. You would have to spend a crap load of money to get a better audiophile belt drive turntable that would be fragile as hell, and you probably won't hear any difference. Just get a good audiophile cartridge and a excellent phono preamp, and you are good to go. That setup will also be good for digitizing your albums. I have a pretty nice Mcintosh Audiophile system, and my turntable is a SL-1210M5G, a Shure M97XE cartridge (i think that are no longer made) and a Bugle Phono Preamp, (I think they are up to a Bugle 3 now) and my records sound fantastic.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Matt View Post
    Thinking of selling my trusty old technics 1210mkii's

    i dont really use them for DJing out anymore , i think my days of heavy mixing on turntables are up.
    so im thinking of just buying one turntable that i can use to listen to my music mostly at home
    Upgrade what you have.
    https://kabusa.com/frameset.htm?/

    With the introduction of the SL-1200 Grand Class Series (SL-1200G, SL-1200GR, SL1210GR, SL-1200GAE) there aren't many people upgrading old Technics any more. But since you already own one, upgrading it would be the cheapest way to get to modern audiophile quality.

    The first upgrade I would do is change from a DJ cart to a hi-fi cart. I've always liked the Shure M97Xe as an entry-level hi-fi cart, but Shure quit making carts.

    I would probably get a Sumiko - Blue Point #2. ($449)
    https://www.amazon.com/Sumiko-Blue-P.../dp/B00C6HD47G

    or

    An Ortofon 2M Blue. ($236)
    https://www.amazon.com/Ortofon-2M-Bl.../dp/B001E0CK3K

    Also a phono preamp.

    The Shiit Mani is considered by most as the best budget level phono preamp.
    Schiit Mani Phono Preamp for MC and MM Cartridges. ($149)
    https://www.amazon.com/Schiit-Mani-P.../dp/B07P8WYX6N

    Or search YouTube for expensive higher end phono preamps.
    "In the early 1990s, the Bose AM-5 held some 30% of the US speaker market. Not Bose the company. Just the AM-5."
    ~ Audioholics.com

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