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Thread: What do you think the most logical order is to learn mixing techniques?

  1. #1

    What do you think the most logical order is to learn mixing techniques?

    So far i've mainly practised doing outro to intro mixing, i've got a pretty good knack for it.

    It sounds smooth and is technically sound, just not very creative and with little overlap.

    The problem I've had is you can't actually tell anyone how to dj as it's a creative skill so I'm trying to break everything down in sort of a chronological order to make it easier and then i can focus on the creativity aspect once i have all the skills.

    What do you think i should focus on next?

  2. #2
    Myself personally I think the first thing to learn after beatmatching & key matching is scratching.
    With so many YouTube videos teaching you how to scratch there's really no excuse for a DJ today to not know a few basic scratches & turntable techniques like back spins.
    "In the early 1990s, the Bose AM-5 held some 30% of the US speaker market. Not Bose the company. Just the AM-5."
    ~ Audioholics.com

  3. #3
    I've already learnt the theory on beatmatching (Just need more practice to do it by ear), mixing in key, phasing etc

    isn't scratching just a hip-hop skill though? (I have no interest in the genre at all)

  4. #4
    Supermod pea Manu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Etienne View Post

    isn't scratching just a hip-hop skill though? (I have no interest in the genre at all)
    It's a [insert genre here] skill. And skills below carries on with the gig while standing on two broken heels.

    Last edited by Manu; 07-18-2019 at 01:24 PM.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Etienne View Post
    isn't scratching just a hip-hop skill though?
    Maybe twenty years ago, but now even mobile DJs use it occasionally.
    Is it possible to DJ without any turntable skills? yes

    But it is also possible to DJ without knowing how to beat-match.
    Knowing basic skills like transitions, turntablism, filters & effects, crowd reading, music theory, etc., will make you a more rounded DJ.
    Anybody with a smartphone can be a DJ. To make yourself marketable you need to at least put a minimal effort in making yourself stand out from everybody else.
    "In the early 1990s, the Bose AM-5 held some 30% of the US speaker market. Not Bose the company. Just the AM-5."
    ~ Audioholics.com

  6. #6
    Alright i'll have a go at learning it later on today, even if it's only for thoroughness.

  7. #7
    Deez Beats! KLH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Etienne View Post
    What do you think i should focus on next?
    IMHO (DJF, back me up on this), the most important skill a DJ can have is to know his or her music. A DJ has to know where the necessary parts of the song are:

    * Does it have a usable intro as a transition?
    * Is there a breakdown that can be used as a transition?
    * Is there a fade out or does the track stop?
    * What's the BPM or BPM range of the track?
    * Does the track build energy, keep energy, or lose energy for the dancefloor?
    * What are 2-3 great tracks them mix into this?
    * What are 2-3 great tracks them mix from this?
    * What are some essential cue points to have on this track?

    If you can do those for your tracks, you're ready to practice beatmatching for knowing the track. After that??? Phrase-matching, juggling, and then, yes, scratching.
    -KLH
    Visit DJF's Beginner's MEGA thread and drop by my Facebook Fan Page.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by KLH View Post
    IMHO (DJF, back me up on this), the most important skill a DJ can have is to know his or her music. A DJ has to know where the necessary parts of the song are:
    Yes definitely. Having a library of 100 songs that you know inside out is going to sound a lot better than a library of 10,000 songs you're only familiar with.
    "In the early 1990s, the Bose AM-5 held some 30% of the US speaker market. Not Bose the company. Just the AM-5."
    ~ Audioholics.com

  9. #9
    I completely agree but wouldn't you have to rotate those 100 songs out or you'll just end up playing a similar set week in week out?

    Edit: also i know it's unrelated but if you're beatmatching everything then the BPM never changes, does this mean you move the BPM with the pitch fader when only one track is playing to change the energy. (obviously only a small amount)
    Last edited by Jay Etienne; 07-18-2019 at 03:03 PM.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Windows 95 View Post
    Maybe twenty years ago, but now even mobile DJs use it occasionally.
    Is it possible to DJ without any turntable skills? yes

    But it is also possible to DJ without knowing how to beat-match.
    Knowing basic skills like transitions, turntablism, filters & effects, crowd reading, music theory, etc., will make you a more rounded DJ.
    Anybody with a smartphone can be a DJ. To make yourself marketable you need to at least put a minimal effort in making yourself stand out from everybody else.
    This has to be one of the best quotes ever! I've been DJ'n for 5 years,
    and just got my first DJ controller. I mostly use it for fading in/out, and
    the cue function. (Also as the sound card) I'm not popular in my town
    because I'm the next up coming DJ Jazzy Jeff! You need to read the crowd
    and play what they want, take requests that aren't out of the ball park,
    and if doing an event ask for a song list or a theme and stick to it.. 0.02

    I don't play in high energy clubs either, so being a "DJ" will differ
    from gig to gig.

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