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Thread: What kind of Mic do you use?

  1. #1
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    What kind of Mic do you use?

    I upgraded to a Shure dual Mic kit and I'm finding that its so sensitive that I keep getting feedback. I need to be able to interact with my guests confidently knowing they can hear me clearly and that I won't have a problem with feedback. There's nothing worse than running out on the dance floor to bring attention to the Bride and pump up the crowd and it just going to shit.

    What kind of mic do you use and are you happy with it?

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    Supermod pea Manu's Avatar
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    Moved to Mobile DJ. I think some of the guys have opened a few similar threads about wireless mics in there...

  3. #3
    Moderator DJ Bobcat's Avatar
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    What kind of Mic do you use?

    Quote Originally Posted by DJRD View Post
    I upgraded to a Shure dual Mic kit and I'm finding that its so sensitive that I keep getting feedback. I need to be able to interact with my guests confidently knowing they can hear me clearly and that I won't have a problem with feedback. There's nothing worse than running out on the dance floor to bring attention to the Bride and pump up the crowd and it just going to shit.

    What kind of mic do you use and are you happy with it?
    Itís not so much about the brand of microphone, although there are some with better feedback suppression than others, itís about how you setup your PA system. Feedback occurs when the sound entering a microphone is reproduced by a loudspeaker, picked up by the microphone, and re-amplified again and again.

    Iíve found that the ability to EQ mic channels is the best way to manage feedback to a large degree, but itís really hard to eliminate entirely as room acoustics contribute, and differ widely.

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    Deez Beats! KLH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Bobcat View Post
    Feedback occurs when the sound entering a microphone is reproduced by a loudspeaker, picked up by the microphone, and re-amplified again and again.
    Yep, that's just physics - but I have found wired analog microphones more susceptible than digital wireless ones.

    I use a Line6 wireless mic and it works well if you lower the high-frequencies via EQ (like DJ Bobcat mentioned).
    -KLH
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    The Shure SM58 has been the live music standard forever, everybody from the biggest rock stars down has used this mic live on stage with monitors blasting only feet away(* that does require some aggressive EQ on the monitors) and it retails for about $100. Shure uses this cartridge in many of their wireless systems and to be honest the PG58 isn't a lot worse in terms of feedback rejection so if you can't get good performance from one of these mics they aren't the problem.

    A mic that is in front of loudspeakers will only get so loud before feedback becomes a problem, so you're simply not going to be able to achieve as much of a big booming voice out there as would be possible from behind the speakers. Basic rules for best mic performance are

    1. Keep the speakers as far away from where the mics will be as possible
    2. Cut lows and highs on the mic channel.
    3. Never point the mic directly at the speaker
    4. Never stand directly in front of a speaker at point plank range with an open mic, 15-20ft and beyond should not be a problem.
    Last edited by conanski; 04-29-2019 at 07:06 PM.
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    It's also worth noting that monitors on the stage floor are in that position for this very reason, it's the least most prone to feedback, not much aggressive EQ is needed. A Cardioid mic will go right up to these as long as it's bum is facing it, it's natural position.

    There's a difference between the Shure Beta and non Beta. The Beta is a Super Cardioid the other is Cardioid. The Super trades bum non sensitivity for better lower sides (have a look at the diagrams) this is more ideal for jumping around amongst tripod speakers, especially when facing them, when holding the mic at an angle, the least sensitive point is in line with the speaker. If using the Super with stage monitors it's best to hold the mic completely vertical or horizontal, holding it at the angle you would with a Cardioid (and stage monitors), puts it's more sensitive bum in line with the speaker, not so good.

    The mic channels need a High Pass/Low Cut filter, that would help a lot. Cutting the lows will allow you to turn the mic louder before feedback occurs.

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