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Thread: Riding The Pitch

  1. #11
    I think it is great you are pushing yourself.

    I have just found that light adjustments are more immediate and have not really tried to go against that.

  2. #12
    Member Daniel S's Avatar
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    As with most techniques it's a matter of practicing like you said yourself. You shouldn't have to re-cue. Basically if you get the technique down you should be able to cue up your track at the mixing point, adjust the pitch and make your mix without setting the speed beforehand, if you're in a hurry.

  3. #13
    I'm totally NOT good at this.. I've done it when I had to.. or just for fun.
    But one hint I can give you is, if let's say the track is falling behind, and you need to speed it up.. then at that point when it's catching up, you're now going too fast.. so you gotta back off a little as you approach where you want to be. So you're always going to slide back toward where you came from, just a little bit...

  4. #14
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    Ye I'm getting it close every time but then I'm continuously over/undercompensating. Didn't realise how hard it is not using the jogs!

    Going to be a tough couple of weeks/months practicing this but hopefully it will make me better in the long run ��

  5. #15
    I just want to say that with the throw and go technique, you are relegating yourself to a simple mix outro to intro. Over and over again. There is no room for creativity.

    When do you throw a part of the cued track in to change/enhance the live track? With no re-cue or mixing prior to introducing the new track at the set mix point, you relinquish your ability to be creative with the mix. There is more to DJing, for me, than mastering some skills and being happy with playing those tracks exactly how they were created.

    There is something to be said for teasing in parts of the incoming track, swapping basslines for a bar, mixing into a track and then back into the last one, there are a million ways to mix and I don't think dropping in the next track at the mix point because you do not want to touch the vinyl/platter is for me.

    I like to play around too much.

    I've said it before and I will say it again - if you are not messing up, you are not trying.

  6. #16
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    Ye to be fair I understand exactly where you're coming from. At the moment I'm simply doing long smooth transitions with the occasional layering of tracks and swapping the base over. But that's what I love about mixing and djing there is so much to learn, it's almost neverending! My reckoning is to maybe spend a month solely on riding the pitch and get as good as I can at it. Hopefully then It will boost my confidence which I'm lacking a bit at the moment. Hopefully then I will have a great foundation to start learning new things.

  7. #17
    Member Daniel S's Avatar
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    I don't really know what you're on about. When I said you don't have to re-cue I didn't mean you can't be creative. I just meant you don't have to spend three minutes to over and over check that your tracks are synced up. That leaves more room for creativity when you can drop the track in at any time and do whatever you want with it, when you want to. The reason some DJs prefer riding the pitch isn't because they don't want to touch the records. It's because touching the platter or record often give a more sudden change to the speed, affecting pitch and is more noticable than riding the pitch, which usually sounds smoother.

    As far as being "creative", I'm not really fond of those who mess with the tracks all the time, but that's just my preference. I think it's a bit too much when you get into controlerism and every single beats has to be cut up rearranged. I guess it works for some kinds of music, but more song based genres like deep house, vocal house or trance don't need to be messed with too much. Roger Sanchez is one of those DJs I think has a good balance of "creativitiy". I also like Laid Back Luke, although he can be a bit over the top sometimes.

    Quote Originally Posted by djnotapplicable View Post
    I just want to say that with the throw and go technique, you are relegating yourself to a simple mix outro to intro. Over and over again. There is no room for creativity.

    When do you throw a part of the cued track in to change/enhance the live track? With no re-cue or mixing prior to introducing the new track at the set mix point, you relinquish your ability to be creative with the mix. There is more to DJing, for me, than mastering some skills and being happy with playing those tracks exactly how they were created.

    There is something to be said for teasing in parts of the incoming track, swapping basslines for a bar, mixing into a track and then back into the last one, there are a million ways to mix and I don't think dropping in the next track at the mix point because you do not want to touch the vinyl/platter is for me.

    I like to play around too much.

    I've said it before and I will say it again - if you are not messing up, you are not trying.

  8. #18
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    I can imagine once the technique is nailed on then an individual can be as creative as they like.

    Although I've only been practising this technique the last few days at the moment I'm not very good at it lol, getting used to the tiny adjustments and the drift is going to take time. But I think once I've got it in the bag it will be one of those things where you don't look back. I've said to myself that I'm simply not using the jog until I'm competent at this method. So ye my creativity is sapped whilst learning riding the pitch.

  9. #19
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    Being realistic it could take me up to 6 months to get competent at this

  10. #20
    Supermod pea Manu's Avatar
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    Buy a pair of crappy cheap decks, and you're going to force learn in a few hours.

    Like a pair of numark 1625 or 1650. The wow, flutter and response on those are mad. But if you overcome those, then it's pitch riding skills acquired.

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