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Thread: Looking to start to Dj, need help choosing turntables

  1. #11
    I couldn't afford the Technics 1200 and opted for the Audio Technica AT-LP120XUSB.
    The motors are weak, but they work just fine for vinyl nights. No mixing/Scratching.
    Only thing I did was replace the mats, and the 45 adapters.



    I know it's an older thread, but for mixing/scratching the 120's motors are pretty weak.
    Normal play they are fine.

    Speakers, I've been using the Harbinger Vari V2215 for a couple of years to get by. They
    have a sucky rep, but mine have been rock solid. Guess I got lucky? LOL

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by xj99 View Post
    opted for the Audio Technica AT-LP120XUSB.
    The motors are weak,
    I've never used that turntable but I suspect the motors are as strong or stronger as Technics SL-1200 series turntables.
    "In the early 1990s, the Bose AM-5 held some 30% of the US speaker market. Not Bose the company. Just the AM-5."
    ~ Audioholics.com

  3. #13
    I assumed the 1200's had more torque? The 120's will stall, and even stop
    while doing a simple cleaning with the stock slip mats. With the new rubber
    mats, it's worse. I really like these turntables, but not for torque.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by xj99 View Post
    The 120's will stall, and even stop while doing a simple cleaning with the stock slip mats. With the new rubber mats, it's worse. I really like these turntables, but not for torque.
    Get rid of the rubber mats and use Butter Rugs, or Dr. Suzuki Scratch slipmats instead.

    Or you can make these to go between the platters and the felt-mats.
    1:30
    Last edited by Windows 95; 08-12-2019 at 06:30 PM.
    "In the early 1990s, the Bose AM-5 held some 30% of the US speaker market. Not Bose the company. Just the AM-5."
    ~ Audioholics.com

  5. #15
    Ah, okay cool. Well for now no mixing or scratching, so I'll stick
    with the rubber mats for vinyl nights. Just mostly classic rock,
    and some obscure stuff. It's more of a buy/sell/trade/play vinyl
    type deal. Thanks!

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by xj99 View Post
    Ah, okay cool. Well for now no mixing or scratching, so I'll stick
    with the rubber mats for vinyl nights. Just mostly classic rock,
    and some obscure stuff. It's more of a buy/sell/trade/play vinyl
    type deal. Thanks!
    The rubber mats are for Hi-Fi, the felt mats are for mixing.
    The rubber mats keep the records from slipping & isolate platter noise.
    The felt mats let the records slip.

    Not sure what the reason was audiophiles were using felt mats, but that's the reason DJs were using them.
    "In the early 1990s, the Bose AM-5 held some 30% of the US speaker market. Not Bose the company. Just the AM-5."
    ~ Audioholics.com

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Windows 95 View Post
    Not sure what the reason was audiophiles were using felt mats,
    Quick YouTube search and I found out it was to reduce static.

    1:52
    "In the early 1990s, the Bose AM-5 held some 30% of the US speaker market. Not Bose the company. Just the AM-5."
    ~ Audioholics.com

  8. #18
    Oh wow, I thought the rubber mats would have won that test!!!
    I still have the felt mats, but one is warped. I need to figure out
    how to make it sit flat again...

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by xj99 View Post
    I still have the felt mats, but one is warped. I need to figure out how to make it sit flat again...
    Have you tried just squirting it with a spray bottle (water) and ironing it like a shirt?
    Last edited by Windows 95; 08-13-2019 at 08:46 PM.
    "In the early 1990s, the Bose AM-5 held some 30% of the US speaker market. Not Bose the company. Just the AM-5."
    ~ Audioholics.com

  10. #20
    No, I have not. Thanks for the tip! I'll do some more research so
    I don't mess it up...

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