Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: DJ vs Production to begin with

  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    LEICESTER, UK
    Posts
    8

    Lightbulb DJ vs Production to begin with

    Hello guys and gals! Just joined up to this forum in the hope I may get pointers on where the heck to begin!

    I love my electronic music and always find myself adding bits and remaking music in my head when I hear it... my question/s is/are this...

    Where do i start? Should i mess around on FL studio or similar first? Get a cheap DJ controller? Both?! Which is easier to start with? Cheers in advance!

    MDU

  2. #2
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Paris
    Posts
    28
    a pro DJ told me in another forum that mixing and DJing are completely different. You can start by mixing, adding songs with open softwares. Then when you master it, you can buy hardwares nope? Or harder softwares?

  3. #3
    Supermod pea Manu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    On your screen
    Posts
    5,227
    Both. Try out some software demos to see what you find yourself most comfortable with...

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Teesside
    Posts
    956
    At the higher end, the old art of DJ'ing will die. We'll always have the DJ earning small wages (or the guy who looks after the venues music player) but mainstage will become more production based. The spinning platter, jog wheel, will die and it will be all about sequencing loops and samples etc.

    if you learn DJ'ing it will help you understand music theory a bit. If you learn production it will help you understand DJ'ing a bit. Both feed each other. Learning to DJ wont really get you anywhere, possibly a ghost town residency. Learning to produce will however hold the chance of making it and then you can 'fake' the Dj'ing part as people will be coming to see YOU play YOU. Non of that extreme crowd reading a DJ needs to master playing 4-6 hr sets.

    You won't get the good 1 hr sets, 'YOU' sets, unless you've got the ability to make a half decent track, some people love or at least have the money to put out a track in your name.

  5. #5
    It depends on where you want to DJ. I am a mobile DJ, but started as a breaks DJ (back when all you got was vinyl and decks). I have to play an array of different styles and genres at weddings and parties.

    I still DJ EDM stuff - I have a spot on an online radio station, 3 podcasts, make an occasional mix. I also produce tracks. I think if you want to play in huge venues, producing is the way to go to start off.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by MDU View Post
    Where do i start? Should i mess around on FL studio or similar first? Get a cheap DJ controller? Both?! Which is easier to start with? Cheers in advance!
    Myself personally, I would start with Ableton Live Intro ($100) or Ableton Live Suite ($800). Then buy a midi keyboard ($70 - $1,000) and eventually an Ableton Push 2 controller. ($800)

    Prices are in US dollars because I don't know the prices of the items in the UK.

    Production is definitely harder. In fact I would recommend at least several months (Or a year or two.) of learning how to play piano. Not essential, but it makes it easier to put down what you hear in your head if you know how to play notes. There are cheap programs (And probably YouTube videos.) that can teach you to play.
    The U.S. pentagon budget consumes 80% of individual income tax revenue. The Pentagon spends more on war than all 50 states combined spend on health, education, welfare, and safety.

  7. #7
    New Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    16
    The above comments are bad advice. DJing and mixing are very different. If you do either one long enough, you can visually see the difference in how that person uses a dj mixer. I would use demo software till you commit to one. Then to offset the monotony of "sequencing loops and samples" aka playing with LEGOS, practice djing on turntables or a controller, whatever. start with 2 of the same track and beat match, cue and drop.

    there isn't enough time in life to learn it all, so pick what suits you best. I'm a very skilled DJ. I love the performance art in using turntables. Some like to spend the hours learning how the music is made. Either one will take you 5,000 hours to curate your abilities.

    With that said. Plenty of DJs are famous and never produced. They have skills though. Many got famous through producing and suck real bad at djing.

    If I could do it all over again, I would have forced myself to learn more about production, then again I wouldn't be as skilled of a technician on the mixer if I had.

    Follow the music, let it decide your place in the realm of electronic music.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Teesside
    Posts
    956
    Quote Originally Posted by Max Portland View Post
    The above comments are bad advice.
    Not really, as what you go on to say... supports what has already been said.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Max Portland View Post
    there isn't enough time in life to learn it all, so pick what suits you best. I'm a very skilled DJ. I love the performance art in using turntables. Some like to spend the hours learning how the music is made. Either one will take you 5,000 hours to curate your abilities.
    Unless you're spending a lot of time perfecting your scratching skills, there's no way it should take 5,000 to learn how to DJ.

    5,000 hours 2 hours a day = 2,500 days 7 days = 357 weeks (Or a little over over 6 years & 10 months.)
    The U.S. pentagon budget consumes 80% of individual income tax revenue. The Pentagon spends more on war than all 50 states combined spend on health, education, welfare, and safety.

  10. #10
    Supermod pea Manu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    On your screen
    Posts
    5,227
    Quote Originally Posted by Max Portland View Post
    The above comments are bad advice [...] I would use demo software till you commit to one.
    Ok. Thanks for repeating exactly what I said though. Also, OP subject is not about you. Please keep on topic.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
a