Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: How do you DJ?

  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    10

    Question How do you DJ?

    Hey all!

    I recently took private Djing lessons from a professional who's been doing that for 20+ years. He's a master of tech and deep house so he mixes intro to outro and that's what he teaches.

    I've been to many EDM concerts and festivals where most DJs switch tracks after every drop. Of course I've seen this mostly in Future/Bass/Electro/Progressive House, Dubstep & Trap.

    I can understand DJs who do it this way since crowds usually don't want to hear 5 minute songs and the same drop twice. It feels like in this over-saturated music industry and consumer society that people get bored after 8 bars of one drop.

    I don't have much experience in the concert/club/festival world and wanted to hear from some who can tell me what way of spinning works best with crowds nowadays.

    Of course this will differ across different genres and locations but say I would go for that Bass House vibe, what are people expecting? I don't want to bore them with long 4-7 minute songs and long transitions.

    I may be worrying too much but I want to give the crowd what they expect.


    Thank you!
    Trick Rick
    DJ & music producer
    www.trickrickmusic.com

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by trickrick View Post
    Hey all!

    I've been to many EDM concerts and festivals where most DJs switch tracks after every drop. Of course I've seen this mostly in Future/Bass/Electro/Progressive House, Dubstep & Trap.

    I can understand DJs who do it this way since crowds usually don't want to hear 5 minute songs and the same drop twice. It feels like in this over-saturated music industry and consumer society that people get bored after 8 bars of one drop.
    This, is boring, but this, is an EDM 'concert', where the crowd stare at the 'DJ/Artist' like he or she is doing something amazing. They're not there for the long ride.
    Most modern mainstream EDM tunes are just the same drop twice, they're just shit tunes. Unfortunately there's so much about now that finding and choosing good tunes is very hard and time consuming. And then if you have a mainstream crowd they wouldn't appreciate it anyway. For them just play the same tune for an hour and twiddle and twitch those knobs an each break or drop so it sounds different, they'll not know the difference.

    And don't forget to make some spurious letters with your fingers in the air like you've gotten some kind of palsy from phaser and filter RSI. Proper love that shit they do.

    Quote Originally Posted by trickrick View Post
    I don't have much experience in the concert/club/festival world and wanted to hear from some who can tell me what way of spinning works best with crowds nowadays.
    It's all about the crowd you want to play to, and what you like and educating them into what they should be liking. You're the DJ, control that crowd and teach them.

    Quote Originally Posted by trickrick View Post
    Of course this will differ across different genres and locations but say I would go for that Bass House vibe, what are people expecting? I don't want to bore them with long 4-7 minute songs and long transitions.
    There's nothing wrong with that, especially in a club where you're in it for the night, to lose yourself in the music.
    This doesn't go down too well on youtube or the 'net etc. Because folks want to dip in, have a quick look and listen, dip out to the next online vid or mix.

    Quote Originally Posted by trickrick View Post
    I may be worrying too much but I want to give the crowd what they expect.
    You are. You find your style and the crowd that like your style and choice will follow you and you'll be playing to the right crowd.

    Genre is a factor though, different genres favour different mixing and transition styles, but there's no reason you can't mix them up.

    Eee when I were a lad, we didn't even know where the DJ was in a room, we shared the night with friends and strangers, one style would mix into another, we'd get lost in a hour of long transitions and teases of choice prog classics before the mixes got quicker, the tunes a little faster, the breaks more frequent and the DJ had taken us to techno heaven, then we'd be trance'd away to house heaven where we'd hear some joyous vocal house and we'd leave loving the new friends who were once strangers. Ahhh, I'm an old git.

    You're driving, take them on a magical mystery tour.

  3. #3
    Batman andymunro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    North West - England
    Posts
    1,111
    ...and that just about covers it all really.


    I can't stand lots of quick cuts and short mixes blitzing through tracks every few minutes like one long bootleg mashup when I'm out, it bores the crap out of me. Some of my favourite tunes of all time are 8-10 minutes long and they are that good when I hear them out I want to hear 5 or 6 minutes of it with a long mix in and out.
    * Follow me on Twitter * My latest mixes on Soundcloud / Hear This * All downloads on Hulkshare *
    andymunro.blogspot.co.uk for my tracklistings and links to my 320k mp3 downloads

  4. #4
    New Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by wavespeech View Post
    This, is boring, but this, is an EDM 'concert', where the crowd stare at the 'DJ/Artist' like he or she is doing something amazing. They're not there for the long ride.
    Most modern mainstream EDM tunes are just the same drop twice, they're just shit tunes. Unfortunately there's so much about now that finding and choosing good tunes is very hard and time consuming. And then if you have a mainstream crowd they wouldn't appreciate it anyway. For them just play the same tune for an hour and twiddle and twitch those knobs an each break or drop so it sounds different, they'll not know the difference.

    And don't forget to make some spurious letters with your fingers in the air like you've gotten some kind of palsy from phaser and filter RSI. Proper love that shit they do.



    It's all about the crowd you want to play to, and what you like and educating them into what they should be liking. You're the DJ, control that crowd and teach them.



    There's nothing wrong with that, especially in a club where you're in it for the night, to lose yourself in the music.
    This doesn't go down too well on youtube or the 'net etc. Because folks want to dip in, have a quick look and listen, dip out to the next online vid or mix.


    You are. You find your style and the crowd that like your style and choice will follow you and you'll be playing to the right crowd.

    Genre is a factor though, different genres favour different mixing and transition styles, but there's no reason you can't mix them up.

    Eee when I were a lad, we didn't even know where the DJ was in a room, we shared the night with friends and strangers, one style would mix into another, we'd get lost in a hour of long transitions and teases of choice prog classics before the mixes got quicker, the tunes a little faster, the breaks more frequent and the DJ had taken us to techno heaven, then we'd be trance'd away to house heaven where we'd hear some joyous vocal house and we'd leave loving the new friends who were once strangers. Ahhh, I'm an old git.

    You're driving, take them on a magical mystery tour.
    Wow thank you for this thorough answer! You've completely answered all of my questions. I agree with you when you say people stare at the DJ thinking he's a god. It's sad it has to be this way. Once at a festival, I decided to stop and analyze what was going on. We were basically robots, all moving in the same way, possessed by the music, staring at the stage. It must be a good feeling though, to be that DJ up there with thousands of people bouncing. But people are not having fun together like you said, they're just staring at the DJ the entire time. I myself often find myself facing away from the DJ to have a good time with my friends, but they keep staring and having fun in their own little heads.

    I wish I had lived in those days you speak of.

    I would much rather long mixes and transitions also. They just make more sense and take you on a longer and deeper trip.
    Trick Rick
    DJ & music producer
    www.trickrickmusic.com

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by trickrick View Post
    I wish I had lived in those days you speak of.

    I would much rather long mixes and transitions also. They just make more sense and take you on a longer and deeper trip.
    Go to better events.

  6. #6
    New Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by light-o-matic View Post
    Go to better events.
    Thanks for the tip, I'll look into it.
    Trick Rick
    DJ & music producer
    www.trickrickmusic.com

  7. #7
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    41
    Personally, I mix drum and bass. I have since 1996. I remember the days that Wavespeech speaks of lol, man those were some great days when you had to wade through the crowd to find group of people huddled around the DJ at his booth. There are still some events where I'm at that go off like that, but I do know about the whole stage ordeal nowadays... UGH.. not my cup of tea.

    The way I mix it, is outro's over intros then drop into the next song. Or, intro over a phrase, then the songs break together (for the most part lol), but then the double drop happens. I use both depending on the situation and what I'm trying to do. I do like a nice long 3-4 minute melodic mix. I'm working on an ambient/jazzy dnb mix right now which is 70% double drops. Sounds pretty awesome when I'm listening to it because everything is so layered.

    Sometimes when the mix is going, I'll phase between the 2 songs mixing or swap the basslines or whatever I feel like doing at the time, and whatever sounds good. Really, I need a 3rd deck to add a bit more depth to everything. But thats how I do it... might be boring, I might be the DJ thats not really doing anything all that awesome, but hey it sounds good to me, and I have fun while doing it!

  8. #8
    Batman andymunro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    North West - England
    Posts
    1,111
    I've been DJing since I got my first decks in 96, and reading over and like a couple other remember those days. In my eyes it was Fatboy Slim who brought the showboating to the masses, and I'm not going to knock him for it. By his own admission he was not a technically good DJ and would "showboat" with the faders and EQs to put a performance on for the crowd.

    Others over the years have copied and now it has become the norm for the big DJs and now 1000s of kids getting into it. Thing is though, I honestly feel there was more to watch and learn when DJs played on vinyl. Watching DJs on controllers or CDJs (and i'll even include DVS for the most part) doesn't interest me at all, watching a DJ mix on vinyl is far more interesting because you know it's all manual. I'd much rather watch Carl Cox keeping 3 decks going and just bouncing behind the decks, than the sweedish house mafia pushing buttons and sticking hands up.

    My own style, I've always preferred long mixes and blending tracks over time. I got my new headphones today and was made up playing with them this afternoon and the Dicers I got for Christmas. I'm playing on DVS, no sync, easy to loop and keep the mixes between each track going for a few minutes, extending both the outro of one and the intro of the next. I've got HP & LP filters and Delays mapped to my Novation Nocturn knobs and now I'm very satisfied with my setup.

    My ultimate mixer to keep complete my set up is the A&H DB4 which I'm aiming to get before the end of 2018, I'd not bother with the Nocturn or the Serato effects then, and possibly never bother going to a club ever again
    * Follow me on Twitter * My latest mixes on Soundcloud / Hear This * All downloads on Hulkshare *
    andymunro.blogspot.co.uk for my tracklistings and links to my 320k mp3 downloads

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Teesside
    Posts
    1,075
    Big breakdown after big break down. Heavy drop after heavy drop. Both lose the effect if played 1 after the other so close together. It soon wears off. Through the fear of people getting bored, they make it boring, lucky they only do an hour. No one actually gets invested in the journey.

  10. #10
    Technoez Rek_Aviles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    2,274
    So much this!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by andymunro View Post
    Some of my favourite tunes of all time are 8-10 minutes long and they are that good when I hear them out I want to hear 5 or 6 minutes of it with a long mix in and out.


    Also, "EDM" or Bigroom house tracks have short intros before the first drop so there isn't much time to do a long blended transition. You see more of that in, like you mentioned, Tech House or Deep House and other genres like Trance and Techno (depending on the DJ).





    Quote Originally Posted by wavespeech View Post
    Eee when I were a lad, we didn't even know where the DJ was in a room, we shared the night with friends and strangers, one style would mix into another, we'd get lost in a hour of long transitions and teases of choice prog classics before the mixes got quicker, the tunes a little faster, the breaks more frequent and the DJ had taken us to techno heaven, then we'd be trance'd away to house heaven where we'd hear some joyous vocal house and we'd leave loving the new friends who were once strangers.

    I enjoyed reading that bit
    Last edited by Rek_Aviles; 01-12-2017 at 05:35 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
a