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Thread: Key of the track sorted, but beats are different.

  1. #21
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    thanks man, find 4 more 10 minutes and you're sorted
    Making techno mixes, hoping they fall into the right ears.
    Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/morgan-tracy-6

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Morgan Tracy View Post
    thanks man, find 4 more 10 minutes and you're sorted
    I have now. Its a good set. Gets a bit grindy for my tastes at the end but the mood is right up my alley. good job.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ImNoDJNo View Post
    The problem is that a lot of DJs are ironically not very 'musical'. And so dont understand the concepts of dissonance, and tension and release that can be used to create dramatic tension. They are also happy to hand over the most important aspect of music, the timing, over to a computer completely.

    Its why its so great when you see a DJ who not only understands this, but manipulates it.
    If you don't mind me asking...Could you give a brief description or run down as to what Dissonance, Tension and Release is and how they relate to music theory...???

    I need more music theory help for sure.
    "May the beats be with you" ~ ChewBacca ~

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adzm00 View Post
    Key doesn't even matter. Just disregard organising by key. You can mark the key if you feel it is some useful info (I don't think it is), but just organise is by Genre/Artist, not sure why people try be like "omg i need to organise my tracks together that should mix together".

    At the end of the day DJing is creative, it can be a key that "doesn't go", it can be 10 bpm difference, it can be a totally different genre, enough creativity and you can find a way to mix a lot of tracks together that maybe shouldn't work, but do.
    Perfectly said. There are many times where I have mixed 2 songs that were not in the same key and the mix still came out alright/good. And my dancers/listeners did not even care or noticed.

    I think it comes down to knowing your songs, genres, structures of certain songs/genres and definitely good EQing skills. Also...willing to take a risk and blend 2 songs that are complete opposites is a very unique technique to learn.

    Taking a risk with blending 2 songs that should not match....is technically the main root of ALL DJing. If I remember correctly...its something called a.....(dundundun)....."MASHUP" duhhh. Haha LOL.

    Mashups are supposed to be fun, creative and unique. Who cares about key...as long as it works and sounds good...than your 'golden'.

    I'm planning on making a TON of mashups this year and I am planning to blend 2 different genres/styles that are complete opposites from one another. I really don't care about the key of my songs as much...the only thing I care about is if it sounds 'good'. If it sounds good and alright with my fellow peers/DJ's and anyone else willing to listen to my mix...than I'm golden and smiling from ear to ear.
    "May the beats be with you" ~ ChewBacca ~

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by DjBetta View Post
    If you don't mind me asking...Could you give a brief description or run down as to what Dissonance, Tension and Release is and how they relate to music theory...???
    Your best bet is look them up on Wikipedia - it has some fairly interesting explanations.

    Dissonance is a jarring sounding thing that wants to adjust slightly to sound ''resonant'' or ''harmonious''. Tension is a harmony that sounds like it wants to resolve to another harmony, and release is the harmony that the tension wants to resolve to.

    Not strictly speaking that accurate, but there's my take on them in one sentence.

    Examples of all three probably vary worldwide as they partly depend on what we've been ''trained'' to hear. In our instance, the Western scale system and harmonies.

    As far as the theory tools used to achieve this, there is no substiting for getting your musical theory up a bit. Probably pretty easy now with the interwebz.

  6. #26
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    Delete the flat sounding track from the track list. Group all of the flat sounding tracks together for a new track list.

  7. #27
    Mixed in key will get you about 80 percent there , the next trick is to find out which one of all those tracks u just scanned will go with each other without killing the mood , EQ is what makes songs mix Smooth with each other . without it , it would be a rough dirt road!!!!! some mixers controllers have kill switches on Highs , mid , treble , those are extremely effective.
    Last edited by DarkicePresents; 08-03-2016 at 11:15 AM.

  8. #28
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    I mix techno mainly and also use mixed in key. Mixed in key will help narrow down what track to play next, but just because two tracks are in key doesn't mean they will flow together well if thrown together with no eq work. I find it helps to do a quick assessment of what the strongest elements in each track are and what area of the frequency range they occupy. Say for example both tracks have alot of mid bass, I would cut the bass on the incoming track and have the mids turned slightly down. I used to own a xone 92 mixer and the 4 band eq was fantastic for this use, isolating problem areas in the mix. I also find if the incoming track has alot of sub bass when the playing track does not, it helps to slowly "sneak" in the sub bass to the rhythm, say slowly ramp it up over 8 bars, reaching max volume at the end while tweaking the current tracks bass to suite.

  9. #29
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    Also, are you only taking one step at a time using the camalot wheel, say from 11A-12A? I find this works best.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by brenye View Post
    Also, are you only taking one step at a time using the camalot wheel, say from 11A-12A? I find this works best.
    I see that nobody responded to this post. It's a good question and I'll take this opportunity to make my first forum post.

    Going one step at a time around the Camelot Wheel makes the most sense. 11A is F# Minor. That scale has only three sharps: F#, G# and C#. So moving to 12A works because it's Db Minor has only one note difference than F# Minor.......the note E Flat. So, you are usually safe moving to a scale with only one note difference.

    That scale is not actually called Db Minor however. The real name is C# Minor. That's the only hiccup on the wheel that I can see.

    F# Minor = F#, G#, A, B, C#, D, E, F#
    C# Minor = C#, D#, E, F#, G#, A, B, C# (Notice the only difference is the D# instead of the D)

    That key should not be called Db Minor. The problem is that when you use flats, an issue arises when you get to the "B" note in that scale. On the piano it lands on the note "A", but there's already an A note in the scale (A flat). So you have to call it Bbb (B flat, flat).

    Db, Eb, Fb, Gb, Ab, Bbb, Cb, Db

    You cannot go from Ab to A. There must be a "B" note in the sequence because the notes A, B, C, D, E, F, and G are always represented in some way in every scale.

    Calling it C# Minor solves the problem.
    C#, D#, E, F#, G#, A, B, C#

    The point of the Camelot Wheel is that as you go around it clockwise, each scale changes by only one note. So you're moving to the key that's closest to the one your already in.

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