Page 3 of 24 FirstFirst 1234513 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 239

Thread: Small Questions Thread!

  1. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    130
    http://soundcloud.com/wilmmmm/april-12-blehmix
    derp derp derp, as promised a few weeks ago Sorry, don't know how to embed.

    wasn't feeling very well today, so sorry for lack in quality of....everything lol so many slips haha.
    Done with VDJ7 and Vestax Typhoon that is sort of broken lol.

    Flame away!

  2. #22
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    130
    bump, no tips?

  3. #23
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    1,182
    Quote Originally Posted by BurntToast View Post
    Is there any reason not to use the master tempo function on my CDJs? Seems ideal that this feature exists, so not sure why one wouldn't use it unless they wanted to purposely change the key of a song.
    It really depends on what you're mixing and how you are mixing. I primarily mix Top 40, Hip Hop and Electro, for those genres, I turn on my master tempo/key lock and leave it on and forget about it. If you are mixing trance or something like that and you are mixing harmonically, then if becomes more of a big deal and something to really pay attention to. Do you want to leave it on and keep the key or are you trying to change keys etc.

  4. #24
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    14
    I've got a few questions about harmonic mixing. To start off, i got my keys from beatport. I've got trouble applying all my songs to the camelot wheel as it mentions sharp and flat keys.

    I've got no such keys in my songs i think, are they just rare or am i not getting something here? I do have a heap of #-keys though, wich as far as i know is the same as a semitone. How do i apply those keys to the wheel?

    Help me spread some light upon this! It has bothered me for a while now.

    Thanks!

  5. #25
    In musical notation # means sharp, b means flat. So A# is A Sharp etc. Does that help?
    Quote Originally Posted by DJWhoQE

    After 2 years, DJWhoQE has challenged me again. It's all going to kick off over here.

  6. #26
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    14
    Definitely! Thanks a bunch. However it raised another question about flat keys, since none of my songs seems to be flat. Where and how are they used, since they dont seem to be very common?

  7. #27
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Oakland, California
    Posts
    97
    Back to back, not a good idea. It is kind of lazy and just boring. However if there are two songs by the same artist that you want to play, play them at 2 different time in the set. But no more than two by the same artist in one set!!!

  8. #28
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    1,254
    Quote Originally Posted by Rosten View Post
    Definitely! Thanks a bunch. However it raised another question about flat keys, since none of my songs seems to be flat. Where and how are they used, since they dont seem to be very common?
    Ab and G# are the same thing. It's just a notation difference.

    Habitually, when there are two possible names, classical musicians would prefer one name over another (like slightly prefering G# to Ab or whatever). But AFAIK the decision was always arbitrary.

    With computers, there are reasons to do a lexicographic sort on notes and since b is a letter and # isn't, if you don't pick one or the other for everything, sorting them doesn't put them in order.

    Maschine, for example, doesn't use flats to refer to notes…only sharps. It's easier to code the base pad selection that way.

    I'm sure your key detection software made a similar decision at some point so you could sort by key and have things show up in the right order without telling the program exactly how to sort them. Plus, if you have it written to the beginning of the file name (which a lot of people do) and show them in your file browser (Windows Explorer, Finder, etc.) in alphabetical order, they'll also be in key order.

  9. #29
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    14
    So a # can be either sharp or flat? This keeps getting more confusing!

    My key detection software is me manually searching each and every track on Beatport, getting the key from there then adding it to the Key-infothingy in Traktor.

    Beatport seems to have only #, how am i supposed to know wich is wich?

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Rosten View Post
    So a # can be either sharp or flat? This keeps getting more confusing!

    My key detection software is me manually searching each and every track on Beatport, getting the key from there then adding it to the Key-infothingy in Traktor.

    Beatport seems to have only #, how am i supposed to know wich is wich?
    A# and Bb are essentially the same note. The difference lies in the context and their relation to other keys. Each key is made up of 8 notes. For example, Cmin = C D Eb F G Ab Bb and C (octave). Notice that they go in order up to G and come back around to A. If you were to call that Eb a D#, you would technically be wrong. Why would you be wrong? Because you can't have a D and a D# in the same key... it doesn't make sense. BUT, you could play a "D#" on the keyboard and it would still SOUND correct, because it is an ENHARMONIC note. In the context of the key of Cmin, Eb is the correct terminology, because E is the 3rd note of the C chord, and it is flat because the characteristics that make a key "minor" are a flat 3rd, flat 6th, and flat 7th. Does this make sense?

    This is much more important in music composition rather than mixing. For mixing, just trust your ears! Imagine what the mix would sound like in your head. Do the notes clash? In most cases, you don't want to mix a song in a "darker" key with a song in a "lighter" key. Do the melodies and bass lines compliment each other well? Knowing the key of the song is not as important as just knowing it sounds good or not with another song. Most songs just use a few notes from each key, therefore you are less limited in your options to blend songs in different keys. For example, if song A's outro contains just a bassline that is just a simple C note thumping away, there are a ton of keys with the note C in it that will sound perfectly fine mixed with that note. You don't have to limit yourself.

    In other words, don't worry about mixing songs in key. What's more important is that the notes blend well together. Is this sort of the same thing? Yeah... but as long as the songs sound good together, then go for it. Don't follow the rules too much. If you hear it in your head and it sounds like it works, try it out on the decks.
    Last edited by BurntToast; 05-10-2012 at 10:27 AM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
a