PDA

View Full Version : mixing using channel faders advice



theritcha
06-15-2012, 06:33 AM
can i get some help or advive about mixing with the channel fades,i find it a little tricky raising 1 and lowering the other and tryna mess with eqs while keeping the volume even. some advice or help please?is there any tutorial videos online that can help ,thanks:)

prODucer
06-15-2012, 08:44 AM
Pretty sure the rule of thumb is to keep the playing track at the top position, then bring the incoming track up to that level. As you do this you adjust the eqs and you continue to do so while both faders are at the top position. Then you start lowering the outgoing tracks fader when need be. ;) that's what I do anyhow.

theritcha
06-15-2012, 10:52 AM
thanks mate

TocaTone
06-18-2012, 05:11 PM
I mix pretty much how prODucer described but then again, there's no right or wrong way to do it. Obviously the DJ is doing something wrong if it sounds crap though. The most important thing is to keep an eye out on your channel and master levels. Then use your ears to pick out any overpowering frequencies and tune the EQs to carve out a smoother, more balanced mix.

mrkleen
06-19-2012, 10:20 AM
This is a little off.

If you have Track A playing at 100% and you bring in Track B to 100% - you just doubled the volume on the dancefloor, which is NOT what you want to do.

You basically want to use the volume and EQs to replace elements in Track A - with those same or similar elements in Track B.

I always use the example that Track A is a nearly full glass of water with a small hole in the bottom. Track B is also a nearly full glass of water. You want to try and add water from the second glass (Track B) at the same rate as the water is escaping from the glass (Track A).

Doubling the volume during every transition is NOT what you want to do.

Phi
06-19-2012, 10:47 AM
I pre adjust EQ on the incoming track I.e. kill the bass an most mid (usually) and then raise the incoming volume while taking the high EQ down on the other track, basically replacing the highs, so now both faders are up but the levels are the same as just one track. Then I wait for a good time to swap baselines and do that. Then I mix in the mids while bringing the outgoing mids down. It's easy.

mrkleen
06-19-2012, 11:40 AM
I pre adjust EQ on the incoming track I.e. kill the bass an most mid (usually) and then raise the incoming volume while taking the high EQ down on the other track, basically replacing the highs, so now both faders are up but the levels are the same as just one track. Then I wait for a good time to swap baselines and do that. Then I mix in the mids while bringing the outgoing mids down. It's easy.

A well programmed DJ set should included more than one style of mixing IMO. Some quick cuts, some bass swaps, some smooth long transitions, some overlays for multiple minutes etc. Doing the same mix over and over is zzzzzzzzzz.

Phi
06-19-2012, 01:12 PM
... I don't recall saying it was the only way to mix, or that I even do that most of the time? I said when doing this technique that I "usually" swap highs first.

I was giving a technical representation of how to do the kind of transition that the OP said he was having trouble with.
can i get some help or advive about mixing with the channel fades,i find it a little tricky raising 1 and lowering the other and tryna mess with eqs while keeping the volume even. some advice or help please?is there any tutorial videos online that can help ,thanks:)

:)

mrkleen
06-19-2012, 02:46 PM
... I don't recall saying it was the only way to mix, or that I even do that most of the time?

Then you should have been clearer and said


One of the ways I mix is to pre adjust EQ on the incoming track I.e. kill the bass an most mid (usually) and then raise the incoming volume while taking the high EQ down on the other track, basically replacing the highs, so now both faders are up but the levels are the same as just one track. Then I wait for a good time to swap baselines and do that. Then I sometimes mix in the mids while bringing the outgoing mids down. It's easy.

lingk
06-19-2012, 02:51 PM
Phi Makes good points. That's what I basically do. I sorta "pre" mix tho. I'll load up the next track well before it needs to come in and then with my monitor nob set to play back "Live" and Cue I find the part I want in track B that is cued and EQ it so that when I bring it in, it just adds to Track A. Being able to hear both tracks at the same time allows me to better EQ rather then just taking a guess at what should be taken out. Then at the right point I bring up the volume of track B then with track A and B i start to swap ever Mids, usually with track A fully gone at a bake and cutting over fully to track B.

dj daywalker
06-19-2012, 02:58 PM
I usually take out all of the bass and a lot of the highs. I beatmatch in the first phrase, then take out the eqs as mentioned, then slam it in at the start of the second phrase. Because so much of the eq is out is it hard to notice that a new song came in, it sounds just like the current song added some more eleements. then i fade out a little bit of the highs of the first track and start bringing them in on the second. I also blend the basses instead of doing bass swaps.

Phi
06-19-2012, 03:24 PM
Then you should have been clearer and said...(irrelevant contextual crap)

Ok, next time I'll remember that you will troll me over some irrelevant crap that has nothing to do with the OP while I actually provide a usage scenario that is pertinent to the situation... glad we cleared that up :rolleyes:

mrkleen
06-19-2012, 04:12 PM
Ok, next time I'll remember that you will troll me over some irrelevant crap that has nothing to do with the OP while I actually provide a usage scenario that is pertinent to the situation... glad we cleared that up :rolleyes:

So, now asking for a clarification so that an inexperienced OP doesn't get the wrong impression is "trolling" you?

What a joke.

Phi
06-19-2012, 05:17 PM
Yes. I made the clarification immediately in my second post. There was no need for your interjection unless you lived under a bridge and ate little children i.e. troll.

Note that if your next post attempts to argue this, or mock me ,and drag the thread farther off topic it would be a confirmation of trollish behavior.

..and moving on

mrkleen
06-19-2012, 11:44 PM
-----

noize_unit
06-20-2012, 12:01 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usfWJuFA11I
:rolleyes::facepalm::dance::whack::popcorn:

Atomisk
06-20-2012, 04:34 AM
Pretty sure the rule of thumb is to keep the playing track at the top position, then bring the incoming track up to that level. As you do this you adjust the eqs and you continue to do so while both faders are at the top position. Then you start lowering the outgoing tracks fader when need be. ;) that's what I do anyhow.

That'll result in the mix being much louder than the individual tracks (Unless you're mixing into a club's limiter, but that'd imply you're redlining hard). Use your ears (and check your VU if you must) so that you don't go more than ~+3dB during the transition. Move your volume/EQs according to that. And never play two full kick drums or basslines at the same time... But if you're phrasing your mixes properly, clashing basslines shouldn't be an issue.