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HBL Entertainment
06-15-2012, 03:39 AM
What input should I be plugging my laptop and soundcard into on my Behringer PMP3000 mixer? There are a couple of stereo RCA inputs with trim, EQ, and fader knobs. But there is also a cd/tape input with a rotary knob, but I don't know if that is a trim setting or just a volume control?

Any suggestions?

Andrew B
06-15-2012, 03:47 AM
What are you trying to do?

HBL Entertainment
06-15-2012, 01:53 PM
I am trying to play music from my laptop through a NI Audio 2 DJ soundcard into my mixer. I used to use the stereo pot (11/12) that has the RCA inputs. It has a trim level, EQ, and fader level. The only problem is when music is playing and the channel fader is down but the Main fader is up you can still faintly hear music through the speakers. That happens in both 9/10 and 11/12 stereo channels. When I plug into the CD/Tape input that doesn't seem to happen. But I would rather use the stereo channels because I have more control over input levels and I like the fader as opposed to the rotary knob on the CD/Tape input.

I'm just not sure if those bleeding pots are because of bad circuitry or if I am not using them correctly?

djpenguin
06-15-2012, 03:46 PM
The bleed is more likely due to poor quality of the equipment than improper use. You can try turning the gain knob down for the channel when it's not in use, and that may eliminate the bleed, but it also may not.

There's only so much you can expect from an all-in-one 16-channel mixer with 1200W amp that only costs $400.

ampnation
06-15-2012, 03:58 PM
djpenguin speaks the truth. I've experienced myself with a Behringer desk style mixer.

If you're getting bleed on your channels, the entire mixer probably isn't far behind. I'd sell it and buy a Yamaha MG series mixer instead assuming you need a desk style mixer. They're a good compromise between excellent quality and budget pricing.

Then for an amp, Behringer is actually known for some decent amplifiers, the EP series. (try to match 2x the RMS rating of your speakers making sure you're looking at the proper impedence) or, the Peavey IPR series amps have a good rep and they're very light to boot.

jmack953
06-15-2012, 07:27 PM
The bleed is more likely due to poor quality of the equipment than improper use. You can try turning the gain knob down for the channel when it's not in use, and that may eliminate the bleed, but it also may not.

There's only so much you can expect from an all-in-one 16-channel mixer with 1200W amp that only costs $400.

I agree. The poor quality thing stick out like a sore thumb. Behringer is about as cheap as you can get. When a company uses cheap components to keep thier overall price tag down, things never usually function very well in the end. Some people do have luck with Behringer mixers, but MANY have had issues after simply a year or two, when channels start to go out, insert channels fail, etc etc... they just break down over time.
As ampnation said too.. the actual seperate power amps (besides that junky INuke series) have overall been pretty decent, I'll give them that. Just stay far away from the Inuke series (wattage ratings WAY less than stated by the manufacturer) The EP's are good, I've used them quite a bit over the years (both the 2000 and the 4000) and they hold up pretty good.
Anyways, yeah if you need to get by, then you need to get by, use the channels that at least work to get the job done. If it's within a year of it's lifetime, you could always try and get Behringer to fix it, although that's a waiting game there. They tend to have a 3 to 4 week turnaround at the minimum for repairs because there is always "a part that doesnt happen to be in at this time". Haha. But otherwise, sell it cheap, take a small loss, and upgrade to some higher quality. Yamaha does make really good mixers, powered and unpowered. For ease of not binding yourself into a jam if one thing on the powered mixer breaks down (and therefor youre out a mixer AND amp).. just go passive. Get an unpowered board and either go power amp/passive pa's, or powered pa speakers. You'll appreciate the investment once you make it!

HBL Entertainment
06-17-2012, 03:22 AM
Thanks for your input. I've had it for about 5 years so I guess I beat the odds that that is the only problem. It's way more board than I need and pretty big and bulky. I bought it with the intention of using it for both live sound and djing but my band never got off the ground. I do karaoke once in awhile and the monitor busses and extra inputs are nice, but I would like to find something smaller and better.

ampnation
06-17-2012, 01:05 PM
Here's an example of an inexpensive Yamaha with fewer inputs than you have that is worth considering.
http://www.americanmusical.com/Item--i-YAM-MG102C-LIST?SRC=D0407FG0HAMS0000&utm_source=froogle&utm_medium=feed&

Read the manual first before buying to see if it meets all you needs.