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View Full Version : Could it work on a IPR 3000?



unsafe8989
04-19-2012, 06:24 PM
http://i1087.photobucket.com/albums/j471/unsafe8989/20120419_151343.jpg

A cable I use to split mono signal for sub use.

sss18734
04-19-2012, 06:39 PM
From what I understand there is a Peavey-approved method of bridging these amps. It involves actually bridging the outputs, though, by making a pair of custom speakons. The cable you have is not correct. Don't try it.

Check the Peavey forums for more info.

windspeed36
04-19-2012, 06:39 PM
http://www.djforums.com/forums/showthread.php?5703-Do-NOT-use-Y-splitter-cables-to-combine-signals

jmack953
04-19-2012, 07:08 PM
From what I understand there is a Peavey-approved method of bridging these amps. It involves actually bridging the outputs, though, by making a pair of custom speakons. The cable you have is not correct. Don't try it.

Check the Peavey forums for more info.

I couldn't agree more. As for Peavey themselves, they recommend to not try any modifications to this amp to get it to bridge. As it was not built nor designed to bridge, naturally, there is not going to be an easy way to do it. The cables you got won't work, it can end up throwing the impedance off, and with that, you'll throw the wattage off, causing damage to the subs and or amplifier. If not right away, over time it's going to happen. Please save yourself the headache, and the money, and just run it in it's respective channels only. If not, maybe have to look into a different amp.
I'm not in a status here on djforums to post links yet, but yes, there are some tricks in the peavey forums, but I don't think they have been approved by Peavey themselves, just some knowledgable posters who have tried, and apparently, succeeded. But, it's modification to the outputs or cables, so, be prepared to lose any and all warranty on it when you do that. (Some people, including myself in some cases, this won't make a lick of difference because we are going to go to great lengths for trial and error to get what we want on the outcome, regardless of it working or not) Gaining knowledge is half the battle. Good Luck unsafe8989!!!

Evil Steve
04-19-2012, 07:21 PM
Is this some sort of joke?
Can you send a more detailed picture of that connector?

How did you get that thing to fit on the speakon connectors of the amp?

That's gotta be one of the craziest things I've ever seen...
The post is from April 19'th. Is this a late April fool's gag?

It reminds me of a post I read about the Crown BELCHFIRE amp.
Are you trying to make one of those?

Please try this. I want to know how it works out.

Incognito
04-19-2012, 07:36 PM
The post is from April 19'th. Is this a late April fool's gag?

It reminds me of a post I read about the Crown BELCHFIRE amp.



LOL, I forgot all about that one.. http://www.crownaudio.com/pdf/legacy/belchfire_datasheet.pdf

windspeed36
04-19-2012, 07:45 PM
Wait, my bad with that link. I though he was trying to sum the signal output, not the actual amplified output.

sss18734
04-19-2012, 07:46 PM
there are some tricks in the peavey forums, but I don't think they have been approved by Peavey themselves, just some knowledgable posters who have tried, and apparently, succeeded. But, it's modification to the outputs or cables, so, be prepared to lose any and all warranty on it when you do that.

I do believe that Peavey techs have posted on the forums saying that the method is approved and will not void any warranties. But don't quote me on that. Like I said, visit their forums.

Bridging isn't really anything complicated, but on some high-power amps (like the ones that are supposed to be coming out) it isn't a good idea. I believe Peavey might be aiming for consistency with their IPR line.

monomer
04-19-2012, 08:04 PM
You'll gain a couple db at most by bridging. Whats the point?

sss18734
04-19-2012, 09:01 PM
You'll only add a couple db by adding another sub. What's the point in adding subs? :)

unsafe8989
04-19-2012, 10:35 PM
Yes a joke.

monomer
04-19-2012, 11:58 PM
You'll only add a couple db by adding another sub. What's the point in adding subs? :)

6db for adding one. Going from 100-1k watts is a gain of 3db, not factoring in power compression.

A joke is buying a small, lightweight and cheap amp and expecting it to do more then it's designed to. Nothing against the IPR line at all, I'm switch to them myself. But: I'm buying models that'll handle what I need in the first place, without pushing the limits of the design.

You won't gain what you think by bridging, and the amps not going to like it. But who am I to tell you what to do with your own amp.


.02

windspeed36
04-20-2012, 12:31 AM
6db for adding one. Going from 100-1k watts is a gain of 3db, not factoring in power compression.

A joke is buying a small, lightweight and cheap amp and expecting it to do more then it's designed to. Nothing against the IPR line at all, I'm switch to them myself. But: I'm buying models that'll handle what I need in the first place, without pushing the limits of the design.

You won't gain what you think by bridging, and the amps not going to like it. But who am I to tell you what to do with your own amp.


.02

Isn't it for every double in power you gain 3dB? So going
100w = 0
100w-200w = +3
200w-400w = +6 on 0
400w - 800w = +9 on 0
ect

monomer
04-20-2012, 02:17 AM
copied and pasted from elsewhere (better then I can describe)

A: Decibel (dB)
(1) a logarithmic scale used to denote a change in the relative strength of an electric signal or acoustic wave. It is a standard unit for expressing the ratio between power and power level. Using the logarithmic relationship for power PdB = 10*log[Pout/Pin] , a doubling of electrical power only yields an increase of +3 dB. Increasing the power tenfold will yield an increase of +10 dB and is a doubling of perceived loudness. The decibel is not an absolute measurement, but indicates the relationship or ratio between two signal levels.

100w-1k would be 10db, or "Double" perceived sound level NOT FACTORING IN POWER COMPRESSION.


I stand corrected in my previous posting. I still don't like the idea of bridging the ipr....

sss18734
04-20-2012, 02:29 AM
As long as you do it correctly, there should be no issues. Just do it right. If Peavey says it's fine and will cover it under warranty, that's all the convincing I'd need.

These class D amps are much more durable than people give them credit for. I'm surprised they've been this slow in bringing them into the PA market.

Incognito
04-20-2012, 03:01 AM
Isn't it for every double in power you gain 3dB? So going
100w = 0
100w-200w = +3
200w-400w = +6 on 0
400w - 800w = +9 on 0
ect

Here's some charts I made up for DJF 1.0 on this topic

http://img35.imageshack.us/img35/5106/schart2.jpg

http://img180.imageshack.us/img180/9355/schart.jpg

ampnation
04-20-2012, 05:15 PM
Unsafe, bridging works differently for different amps. But never like that. It is legit to split a mono signal using a y cable on the input side to send the same signal to two different channels or amps. Some amps can do that internally in which case one would use one input and get two identical outputs.

Sent from my ADR6350 using Tapatalk 2

unsafe8989
04-20-2012, 07:33 PM
Yes I know just wondering if a pre made bridge cable was made already.