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kickassDJ25
02-15-2012, 05:27 PM
Just after watching a few videos there on scratching, it looks really tricky for a newbie.

It seems like u need a beat on one deck and some form of scratch sample on the other, so does this mean u can't scratch a normal house tune for example? can u only scratch samples?

g-sep
02-15-2012, 05:36 PM
You can scratch over whatever beat you want. But for beginning, I would start out with something slow, so you can work on your timing and the basic scratches.

kickassDJ25
02-15-2012, 05:50 PM
You can scratch over whatever beat you want. But for beginning, I would start out with something slow, so you can work on your timing and the basic scratches.

where do u get scratch samples?

djkvg
02-15-2012, 05:50 PM
You can scratch over whatever beat you want. But for beginning, I would start out with something slow, so you can work on your timing and the basic scratches.

work your way up to 128bpm because scratching at that bpm isn't easy. i started around 90 cuz i had a good rhythm going

djkvg
02-15-2012, 05:50 PM
where do u get scratch samples?

u can get scratch samples at thudrumble.com or if you are subscribed to a record pool they usually have a couple

kickassDJ25
02-15-2012, 05:52 PM
can u only scratch a beat?

kickassDJ25
02-15-2012, 05:53 PM
u can get scratch samples at thudrumble.com or if you are subscribed to a record pool they usually have a couple

I'm with DJcity, they don't have any:(

kickassDJ25
02-15-2012, 05:55 PM
also, whats a break? is this different to a scratch sample?

Nick Bike
02-15-2012, 06:01 PM
I'm with DJcity, they don't have any:(

grab the Rectangle breaks on there. lots of tools to scratch with.

Haddock
02-15-2012, 06:31 PM
A sample is the sound you manipulate to create a scratch. Breaks, as a genre, are extended parts of, usually, a drum pattern from old funk and soul songs. An individual break is when one of those songs "breaks" into a part that really "grooves" (If i can quote Afrika Bam). Usually it is a stripped down drum pattern that cats juggle between turntables to extend or "remix" the beat. Check out Clyde Stubblefield. He played most of the drums that early breaks were based on.

Use real vinyl for your samples! Not timecode! This is my opinion, but real vinyl battle records (has both samples and breaks) feel so much more "physical" and personable. Dirtstyle and Skratchy Seal make great battle records that you can pick up anywhere online.

Dj_4-$hure
02-15-2012, 06:31 PM
I've found scratch samples on beatport, just look up scratch tool. And for beats just stick to beats you like, or if you want breaks check Q-berts breaktionary, ther'es many volumes and awesome to scratch too.

DjDisArm
02-15-2012, 09:28 PM
where do u get scratch samples?

buy scratch records

DJArmani
02-15-2012, 09:49 PM
try looking for instrumentals. shook ones - mobb deep instrumental is great to begin with, i still use the track now..

bernardgregory
02-15-2012, 11:31 PM
Use real vinyl for your samples! Not timecode! This is my opinion, but real vinyl battle records (has both samples and breaks) feel so much more "physical" and personable.

Co-sign

djkvg
02-16-2012, 02:35 AM
djcity has plenty of scratch samples lol

NastyPoPo
02-16-2012, 01:43 PM
Hey, I use a vci-300 mkii and I was wondering if its practical to even practice scratching on a controller... I have seen people doing it through youtube, so I feel like it is possible, but I worried that learning on a controller would be considerably different from realy vinyl..? Thoughts?

Sigma
02-16-2012, 02:52 PM
Hey, I use a vci-300 mkii and I was wondering if its practical to even practice scratching on a controller... I have seen people doing it through youtube, so I feel like it is possible, but I worried that learning on a controller would be considerably different from realy vinyl..? Thoughts?
Go for it I say. It does feel different, but the fundamentals of what you're doing are the same. What are the other options? Either never learn, or pick up some decks one day, but if you learn to scratch on your controller then what you've learned will translate over to turntables in pretty much no time, so there's basically no reason not to do it. :D

ccabungcal
02-16-2012, 03:30 PM
Check out Dj Angelo tutorials, Studio Scratches, or Dj Shiftee's salsa school of scratch on youtube. Great tutorials!

bernardgregory
02-17-2012, 04:16 PM
Hey, I use a vci-300 mkii and I was wondering if its practical to even practice scratching on a controller... I have seen people doing it through youtube, so I feel like it is possible, but I worried that learning on a controller would be considerably different from realy vinyl..? Thoughts?

I feel like scratching is 50/50 between the platter and the fader. so practicing on a controller will get you there, but when you get to vinyl there are other factors to consider, mostly dealing with the needle on the record.

for example, no matter how hard to hit the platter on a NS7 the record wont skip... with a piece of vinyl you'd have to be more delicate.

this is coming from a beginner scratch person that has used both so take it for what you will

peterwo2e
02-20-2012, 02:46 PM
Hey, I use a vci-300 mkii and I was wondering if its practical to even practice scratching on a controller... I have seen people doing it through youtube, so I feel like it is possible, but I worried that learning on a controller would be considerably different from realy vinyl..? Thoughts?

once you get digital i dough you will go backwards to vinyl. the vci-300 is great for scratching or at least baby scratches if that is what you like to do.

NastyPoPo
02-20-2012, 09:57 PM
Aight, thanks for the insight. I will keep working on it and watch others throw down. I would like to see tutorials on a controller, but I mostly see vinyl. I can still get the concept from them though.

DjDisArm
02-24-2012, 12:54 PM
it takes a lot of practice... so put the time in...dont get too frustrated if you dont pull it off..start with baby scratches, transformers, tears, and flares look them up on youtube... then you can go to a more advanced scratch like a chirp flare.. which im working on...its pretty difficult but you got to put in work

DougMore
02-25-2012, 01:48 AM
Make sure to practice with your off hand. If you're not naturally ambidextrous, than you'll be rewarded by practicing with both hands.

djdran
03-09-2012, 03:46 PM
yeah i used to pratice scratching on the NS6 (similar to the VCI300), i found it very hard.. but you do get to learn the fundamentals of scratching.. when i moved to real vinyl the basics were there... so transitioning was actually not bad at all..

Finnish_Fox
03-09-2012, 04:22 PM
work your way up to 128bpm because scratching at that bpm isn't easy. i started around 90 cuz i had a good rhythm going

What are you scratching over that is 128bpm?

Fusic
03-09-2012, 04:43 PM
What are you scratching over that is 128bpm?

I think he was picking up on the fact that the OP specifically asked about scratching over house music