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View Full Version : How do/did you pick yourself up.



Zafire
10-18-2012, 11:00 AM
Yo guys,

So i've recently started messing around with Dj'ing and i'm loving it!

However i would enjoy it so much more if i wasn't so harsh on myself which for me i think is my biggest stumbling block. I have goals which i want to achieve and obviously as i'm just starting out i'm no where near these, which is understandable.

I'm a noob in all meanings of the word when it comes to Dj'ing but when i make a mistake or even when things just don't sound quite right i get really down on myself about it as i know how i want it to sound and what i want to be doing, even though i'm only playing in my apartment on my own.

The reason it bothers me so much is sometimes i'll mess around and everything will be near spot on in regards to beatmatching etc and then other times it sounds like a steaming pile of shit :lol:

Consistency is key?

I guess you could say i'm trying to beat the 100m sprint world champ before i've even learned to walk.

I feel that getting myself down on the mistakes is hindering the learning process in a way for me, which really isn't a good thing.

How did you guys / girls deal with this when you first started out or even now when things don't go quite right?

Or am i being to critical?

KLH
10-18-2012, 11:15 AM
Consistency is key? am i being to critical?
Consistency is key. It's hard to say if you're being critical.

Remember the easiest path to consistency is repetition (aka practicing). The only way you will know that you're improving is to record and listen to yourself. I highly recommend doing so.

-KLH

tuurrtles
10-18-2012, 11:31 AM
Yeah for sure, record yourself.

And keep posting on this site - you'll learn a lot. I went through a loooong period of just crappy deejaying, mostly because I didn't follow any sort of typical mixing "rules" for lack of a better word, but then I finally got proficient on my controller. Now I'm using CDJs and I'm going through a whole new learning process, so I know how you feel right now.

I'd say the best way to pick yourself up is to set a goal for yourself to do something you can accomplish - maybe a twenty minute mix of like 4 songs with perfect beatmatching? Then when you get critical of yourself, have a listen. Then keep increasing the goals... That's what I'm trying to do.

Also, make sure you remember the most important thing to deejaying is your song selection. So have fun looking for new music, and take pride in your collection. This is what got you into deejaying int he first place - wanting to share your musical tastes with the world. So keep that your main priority and keep practicing mixing every day and it'll come around.

The Blackest
10-18-2012, 11:41 AM
9 times out of 10, you're being too critical. Just keep practicing and learning your tunes. Can't stress that enough.

Smallz
10-18-2012, 01:23 PM
9 times out of 10, you're being too critical. Just keep practicing and learning your tunes. Can't stress that enough.

this. i find there are two type of people that i target my mixes to: people who just like listening to it, and djs who like listening to the technicality of it. The first group gives me criticism on how the song selection is, and djs give me advice on beatmatching and mixing techniques. Both ideas are extremely crucial for djing.

Zafire
10-18-2012, 06:10 PM
Thanks guys.

Yeah i possibly am. I'll try the recording thing, even 4 or 5 tracks in a mix and just keep doing those over and over till it's perfect.

I guess practice and knowledge is just lacking atm so it can only get better i guess :P

I'll try and put a small mix together and fire it on up here for some feedback from the forum!

DJ Matt
10-18-2012, 06:22 PM
be positive at all times.
enjoy the learning process.
dont expect to be able to do everything straight away, just take it one step at a time and enjoy each piece of progress you make.


on the bright side:
i have met guys who think they sound great and sooo... did not sound great at all.

you clearly are a perfectionist.

which can be a good thing.

however if you are finding that things are apparently sounding great one day and the next day they just are not... this suggests to me that there is a degree of luck involved in the times when it sounds good. if you know what you are doing, it should be more consistent. and you should know exactly why something didnt sound good.
so, perhaps there is just a little more learning needed.

have patience :)

Era 7
10-18-2012, 06:57 PM
9 times out of 10, you're being too critical. Just keep practicing and learning your tunes. Can't stress that enough.

exactly. that's something you have to realize. you will eventually become consistent with the basics. took me long enough but as soon as you get it down it's like riding a bicycle. have friends give you feedback on your stuff etc..

and like matt said: be patient. this isn't something you'll get down in a few weeks or in the matter of one or two months. to give you a perspective: retrospectively my entire first year i sucked. but then it just made "click" and stuff worked out and it just got better from that point on :)

Hausgeist
10-18-2012, 08:27 PM
If you are not your own worst critic someone else will be. Practice doesn't necessarily make perfect, but it will make better. Keep at it.

Zafire
10-18-2012, 11:47 PM
Cheers guys it all makes sense what you are all saying!

I think i've been expecting too much too soon so i'm gonna chill out with it a bit and put more into enjoying it, hopefully that will work out better!

BlueSwan
10-19-2012, 01:12 AM
this. i find there are two type of people that i target my mixes to: people who just like listening to it, and djs who like listening to the technicality of it. The first group gives me criticism on how the song selection is, and djs give me advice on beatmatching and mixing techniques. Both ideas are extremely crucial for djing.
Very true. And really, it is easy getting caught up in the technicalities being more concerned about creating flawless transitions than actually picking great tracks. I have only started doing DJ mixes this year (but have been producing electronic music for over 20 years) and when I listen to my first mixes there are a few dubious transitions here and there but the tracks themselves are AWESOME. With my more recent mixsets the transitions are better, but the track selection is perhaps more boring.

The vast amount of listeners will be mainly interested in hearing good tracks. I think first and foremost one should pick tracks that are really strong and that go well together, and then try to make the best transitions from there on - not the other way around. As I indicated, I'm having a hard time doing that myself as well.

djromanj
10-19-2012, 03:34 AM
Just keep at it!
Record your mixes and listen to them. Yes you are your own worst critic.
You would be amaze to play your own mix to a friend, your friend would think its fine, while you from a dj standpoint think it was terrible!

disparate
10-19-2012, 05:38 AM
It's cool to have a bit of self-criticism if it motivates you to keep practising, but not to the point that it takes the fun away. I have moments when I'm judging my mixing/track selection too much, sometimes it's good to just take a break for a while or have a mix with a friend or something, refresh your perspective.

Sigma
10-19-2012, 07:36 AM
Being critical of your own talent (or lack of :P) is a skill in itself. You have to find the right balance with it. You also have to be realistic with time scales so you don't expect too much too soon.

It also depends what type of person you are. Some people will let failure (or perceived failure) frustrate them to the point where they do the particular activity less or even give it up altogether. Others will use failure to motivate them to do the activity more. It's the glass half empty/half full thing.

I would rather DJs hone their skills before they start putting out mixes/tracks and looking for gigs. Don't run before you can walk. Some people get their first setup and are posting "mixes" (like 2 tracks mixed together) in the first few days. What's the point? But at the same time, being so critical that you're constantly saying "I need to reach point X before I put out a mix or go for this gig" while X is constantly moving away from you is just gonna lead to you being a DJ that nobody ever hears.

Once you can record a full mix without messing up, it's time to post one up on here. Get feedback from your peers. Take that feedback and work on getting better. The cycle repeats and you'll hopefully get to where you want to be at.

tuurrtles
10-19-2012, 07:57 AM
I find that sometimes recording a mix, when I listen to it right afterwards I'm very critical and notice every mistake. In that case, leave it for a while and don't listen to it. Come back to it in a few weeks/months and have a listen, and your critique might change. You might actually enjoy the mix.

I did this as a songwriter too (I play guitar/sing). I was so critical of myself at the time of recording that it wasn't even enjoyable, but when I go back to the songs from time to time now, I actually enjoy listening to them. I still notice mistakes, but it's from a whole new perspective where I'm thinking "Overall, this is pretty good!" The average listener, I think, will give you a break and not worry too much about mistakes, especially if track selection is good.

Like Sigma says, take your time. You will know when you are proficient. No need to post a mix that isn't beatmatched, because you know what the obvious critique will be. Once you think your mix is good, post it on here for a refreshed perspective and some constructive criticism. Hone your craft, fine tune it.

And don't forget to critique others' tracks as well. And read the track submission guidelines before posting.